What is the Best Band Saw Blade? (Wood, Plastic, Metal, & More) (2024)

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Let’s get one thing straight. You know that bandsaw sitting in your workshop? The way it cuts isn’t just about the machine. It’s all about the blade. Imagine using a butter knife when you really need a steak knife – not the best idea, right? If you pick a blade that’s the wrong size or made from the wrong stuff, you might as well wave goodbye to that perfect project you had in mind.

Now, I’ve got your back. I’ve tested the best bandsaw blades out there to make sure you get the best bang for your buck and save your precious materials. Stick with me, and we’ll make sure your bandsaw sings the right tune!

Premium Option
LENOX Tools 8010838PW185
Editor’s Choice
BOSCH BS80-6H
Budget Option
POWERTEC 13104
LENOX Tools 8010838PW185
BOSCH BS80-6H
POWERTEC 13104
• Shatter-Resistant
• Bi-Metal Blades
• Material Design: Tuff Tooth
• Blade Length: 44 ⅞ inch
• 5-blade Kit
• Heat-Resistant
• Advanced Tooth Geometry
• Teeth Count: Six
• Overall Weight: ‎5.5 ounces
• Length: 80 x 0.5 inches
• Heat-Resistant Material
• Premium Carbon Steel Blade
• Length: 59 ½ inch
• All-Rounder
• Geometric-shaped Design
Premium Option
LENOX Tools 8010838PW185
LENOX Tools 8010838PW185
• Shatter-Resistant
• Bi-Metal Blades
• Material Design: Tuff Tooth
• Blade Length: 44 ⅞ inch
• 5-blade Kit
Editor’s Choice
BOSCH BS80-6H
BOSCH BS80-6H
• Heat-Resistant
• Advanced Tooth Geometry
• Teeth Count: Six
• Overall Weight: ‎5.5 ounces
• Length: 80 x 0.5 inches
Budget Option
POWERTEC 13104
POWERTEC 13104
• Heat-Resistant Material
• Premium Carbon Steel Blade
• Length: 59 ½ inch
• All-Rounder
• Geometric-shaped Design

Reviews of the Top Band Saw Blades

1. BOSCH BS80-6H

Despite being highly affordable, the BOSCH BS80-6H is the kind of bandsaw blade built for heavy-duty cutting applications. Its durability is mainly owed to the heat-resistant material the blade was made with. 

When I got my hands on this blade, the price was the last thing that caught my attention. Instead, I was genuinely wowed by its 80 x 0.5 inches size and the neat six teeth per inch design. Believe me, it’s a game-changer and fits most bandsaws out there. 

And because its material is made to resist heat, users can expect it to offer smoother bandsaw operations and lessen the chances of wearing. 

What i Like

What i Don't Like

2. LENOX Tools 8010838PW185

If you’re engaged with several bandsaw projects, buying blades like LENOX Tools 8010838PW185 is a smart move, especially because they’re sold in bulk. So if one blade wears out, you have plenty of spares to work with. 

Upon looking closely at the blade, I’m sure its tuff tooth design will stir your interest as it does ours. With this feature, the blade’s cutting edge can remain durable and sharp despite extensive usage. 

These blades can resist shattering, indicating that they can bend without risking damage. Because of this, you can count on this blade option for tough cutting conditions.

What i Like

What i Don't Like

3. POWERTEC 13104

As a blade measuring around 59.5 inches, it didn’t surprise us that POWERTEC 13104 can handle most cutting tasks. And since it’s constructed with high-grade carbon steel material, its durability will prevent any potential damage during heavy-duty usage. 

It can cut accurately at any speed setting as it’s optimized with a geometric tooth design. Thanks to this, cutting different materials like wood, plastic, and metal won’t be an issue, as long as this blade is properly maintained. 

This feature is also aided by a carbonated hard edge blade, making cutting results seamless and accurate. 

What i Like

What i Don't Like

4. DEWALT DW3986C

As a brand widely known for reliable woodworking machines [1], testing DEWALT DW3986C portable bandsaw blades isn’t something we can skip. It has a Matrix II high-speed steel edge that can resist heat and lower the chances of wearing. 

The blade’s hardness rating can be measured around RC 65-67 standards, further proving its lasting durability. Because of this, cutting medium metal pieces, thick or thin, won’t be an issue. 

And as if that wasn’t enough to prove its strength, did you know that this blade has an alloy steel backer? With this component, the blade can resist fatigue as well.

What i Like

What i Don't Like

Band Saw Blades Buyer’s Guide

Length and Width

If you’re looking to get the best out of your bandsaw, make sure you pick a blade with the right length and width for whatever you’re slicing through. Trust me, it makes a huge difference!

If these features aren’t included in the manual, we suggest using the length formula (2XA) + (3.14XB). In this equation, A is the distance between the center and the upper wheels. Meanwhile, B is the bandsaw’s diameter. 

As for the blade’s width, you’ll have to consider what type of cuts you’ll be doing. If it’s just a straight cut, wider blades will be useful. However, smaller blades are more accurate and suited for intricate cutting jobs. 

Thickness

When buying thick bandsaw blades, you should know that they’re more susceptible to breaking and bending than thinner ones. However, our testers would also like to note that they can endure more strain when cutting tough materials. 

If you ever find yourself needing to bend or twist the blade while you’re cutting, I’d recommend going for a thinner blade. It’ll make your life so much easier. 

TPI

Tooth Per Inch (TPI) signifies the number of teeth your blade has. It also helps in getting smoother cuts. If you ask us, blades that are great for general use range around 6 to 8 TPI.

However, a regular blade with 2 to 3 TPI should be enough to cut thick materials. For intricate projects, blades with around 14 TPI should be your standard. 

Choosing the appropriate TPI for your blade depends on the material thickness, desired cut quality, and the specific application, ensuring optimal performance and achieving the desired results.

Blade Type

Regular Tooth

True to its name, regular tooth blades have equally-proportioned teeth spacing. Thanks to this, it’s highly suitable for general-purpose bandsaw usage. 

Rather than durability, these blades are known for their finer finish on thin materials. 

Skip Tooth

These blades are designed with teeth widely spaced from one another. Each tooth is positioned at a 0-degree rake-like angle, making it resistant to clogging and suitable for cutting metal and plastic. 

Hook Tooth

Unlike the other two options, hook-toothed blades are designed bigger. Thanks to its 10-degree rake angle, the blade’s material feeding process is more consistent. It also cuts faster than other blades. 

Material Durability

If you scan the market as much as we did, most of the blades you’ll encounter are made with bi-metal and high-carbon material. Now, how can you tell which is better? The answer still depends on what kind of material you’ll be cutting. 

Cutting typical materials like wood and plastic for a carbon-made blade won’t be a problem. In fact, it can even handle fiberglass and other non-ferrous materials. Meanwhile, bi-metal blades are durable enough to cut stainless steel and other metal types. 

Advantages of a Good Band Saw Blade

Must-Know Tips

FAQ

What bandsaw blade should I use to cut steel?

The best bandsaw blade you should use to cut steel is a bi-metal variation. You should also consider ones with hook teeth arrangements as it has a more consistent material feeding process. 

My Top Pick For a Band Saw Blade:
BOSCH BS80-6H

Given that BOSCH BS80-6H has a 6 TPI teeth configuration suited for general use, our tool testers concluded that it’s the best band saw blade on the list. 

You know, despite its wallet-friendly price, this blade genuinely impressed me. It’s built like a premium product and can stand up to the heat, especially when cutting through various materials.

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Robert Johnson is a passionate furniture maker & carpenter, sought after for his knowledge on the craft.
You’ve probably seen his down-to-earth wisdom in USA Today, Bobvila, Family Handyman, and The Spruce, where he has shared commentary and guidance on various woodworking topics.

Robert is the brain behind Sawinery, where he aims to share tips, tricks, and a passion for all things carpentry.

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