What are the Best Chainsaw Gloves? Perfect For Logging & More (2022)

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Chainsaw users may heed more attention to their safety during operations, but prep essentials like helmets and gloves are equally as important. Using your bare hands can lead to more risks, but using flimsy and uncertified gloves won’t keep you safe either. 

So, our team has tested some of the best chainsaw gloves to prove that there’s nothing more important than keeping your hand safe.

Premium Option
VGO Protective Chainsaw Gloves
Editor’s Choice
Oregon Chainsaw Safety Gloves
Budget Option
YOUNGSTOWN Chainsaw Glove
VGO Protective Chainsaw Gloves
Oregon Chainsaw Safety Gloves
YOUNGSTOWN Chainsaw Glove
• Textured PVC Palm Patches
• Type: Left Glove Protection
• Material: Goat Leather
• Neoprene Cuffs
• Cut Resistant
• Left-hand Protection
• Smooth Leather Construction
• Cut Resistance & Waterproof
• Sizes: S to XL
• Close-fit Wrist Protection
• Puncture Resistance
• Design: Kevlar Material
• Cut Resistant
• Soft Terry Cloth Thumb
• Outer Layer: Non-slip Reinforcement
Premium Option
VGO Protective Chainsaw Gloves
VGO Protective Chainsaw Gloves
• Textured PVC Palm Patches
• Type: Left Glove Protection
• Material: Goat Leather
• Neoprene Cuffs
• Cut Resistant
Editor’s Choice
Oregon Chainsaw Safety Gloves
Oregon Chainsaw Safety Gloves
• Left-hand Protection
• Smooth Leather Construction
• Cut Resistance & Waterproof
• Sizes: S to XL
• Close-fit Wrist Protection
Budget Option
YOUNGSTOWN Chainsaw Glove
YOUNGSTOWN Chainsaw Glove
• Puncture Resistance
• Design: Kevlar Material
• Cut Resistant
• Soft Terry Cloth Thumb
• Outer Layer: Non-slip Reinforcement

Reviews of the Top Chainsaw Gloves

1. Oregon Chainsaw Left-Hand Protection Leather Gloves

Oregon gloves have a great reputation in the industry, so it’s not surprising to see that it’s made of premium thick leather material. Thanks to this, its inner layer can naturally fit the hand and give the chainsaw operator more dexterity. 

We also noticed that cut-resistant chainsaw gloves have breathable cloth material upon inspection. Because of this, we’re sure this safety gear can provide comfort during long hours of chainsaw work.

The Oregon Chainsaw Safety Gloves are layered with reinforced material, which complies with international protective gear standards. Although its reinforced feature only comes in one hand, you can opt to buy the right chainsaw gloves if you want. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

2. VGO Protective Chainsaw Gloves

It’s more expensive than other brands, but VGO protective chainsaw gloves proved their incomparable value with its 12-layer chainsaw protective material. Besides chainsaw work, these protection gloves can handle tough metal and DIY jobs because it’s made of hard-wearing goat leather

If you scan it closely, you’ll notice a PVC material attached above the goat leather. You may not know, but it gives this pair of gloves a better grip, making your cutting activities more efficient.

During the test, our team witnessed the durability of the chainsaw glove as it halted the cutting operation upon blade contact. Additionally, its Neoprene cuff prevents material entry when you get your gloves wet. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

3. Youngstown Chainsaw Glove

If you want utmost cut protection, you’ll need to wearing gloves with Kevlar lining like the ones we tested from Youngstown. It’s a durable and thick material that can go against chainsaw blade engagement. 

And you know what’s more impressive than that? The entire glove has DuPont Kevlar fiber attached to its palm. 

The Youngstown Kevlar chainsaw gloves also offer enough impact protection and anti-vibration capacity, so you can trust that they can withstand tough cutting conditions.

Chainsaw accidents like tool slipping are less likely to happen, especially because Youngstown chainsaw gloves have non-slip reinforcement and velcro closure. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

4. Husqvarna 579380210 Chainsaw Gloves

As you can already tell, not all chainsaw gloves are sold in different designs or colors. Because of this, these Husqvarna gloves easily caught our team’s attention. At first glance, we’re impressed with the integration of foam-laminated spandex into its design. 

Not only does it improve mobility, but it also makes the glove stylish. Depending on your preference, you can wear chainsaw gloves with cut-resistant material on either hand. One hand can aid for comfy use and the other for better grip. 

And because it’s made of goatskin, we can assure you that these Husqvarna chainsaw gloves 579380210 can last longer than typical alternatives.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

5. Endura® Hi-Viz Chainsaw Gloves

Considering that it has eight-layer chainsaw protective materials, there’s no denying that Endura® Hi-Viz Chainsaw Gloves are specifically designed for tough cutting tasks. It’s also constructed with durable components like nylon, leather, and spandex, which helps for excellent user comfort. 

The high-speed chainsaw chain motion and motor may cause unnecessary vibrations, but you wouldn’t have to worry bout it if you’re wearing Endura gloves. This gear can protect your hands from fatigue with its anti-vibration reinforcements, making it highly suitable for chainsaw use. 

The Endura® Hi-Viz Chainsaw Gloves also have a cut-resistant material on the front and back to ensure that you can maneuver the chainsaw safely without risking cuts. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

6. STIHL Heavy-Duty Work Gloves

As a renowned chainsaw manufacturer, we couldn’t resist trying to find the best chainsaw gloves among STIHL’s product offerings. After testing this pair of chainsaw gloves using the sharpest blades, we could prove they can stand against cuts and erosion. 

The Stihl Heavy-Duty Work Gloves highly reflective cloth material will make these gloves easier to spot regardless of the cutting conditions. Should you still get involved in a chainsaw accident, the advanced reinforcement at the back of the gloves will save you from potential injury. 

It also features multi-ply layers, so you can rest easy that it’s completely cut-proof.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

7. Echo OEM Protection Gloves

Although not as popular as other options, Echo OEM Protection Gloves are also made of Kevlar. It’s a strong fiber and light enough not to strain your hands. Unlike how common chainsaw gloves work, they can withstand high-temperature conditions very well. 

These protective gloves are also true to their given size. Upon testing, it fits well in our tester’s hand and grips the chainsaw well without slipping. It has a pull-on closure, so we suggest using that feature to keep the hand protection gear tightly attached to your wrist. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

Chainsaw Gloves Buyer’s Guide

Size and Fit

The sizing options for chainsaw gloves are pretty much the same as any other gloves on the market. Depending on your hand size, it can range from small to extra large. However, it’s crucial to note that not every brand offers a wide range of sizes. 

When buying gloves, we urge you to get ones that fit your hand really well. Gloves that are too small can make you uncomfy, while bigger ones may slip and cause an accident.

Left Hand Size

As you know, your left hand is often the one in the blade’s proximity. Because of this, you’ll notice that most of the options we tested provide more protection on the left glove. 

If you can, it’s always wise to buy ones with extra padding to protect your hands better. 

Material Durability

Although many products may claim that they have durable construction, there are other components you must look for in a glove, like its durability and strength. Here are the materials you can trust to have these features. 

Prolar

This material is often used in the glove’s inner layer. When it contacts the chain, it can get jammed in the sprocket and stop the operation. You can rely on this material to avoid serious chainsaw injuries. 

Leather

If you’re doing heavy-duty tasks, leather [1] gloves are great options to consider because of their great resistance to wear and tear. Even if your gloves get wet, these materials can maintain a good grip on the chainsaw.

Kevlar

You may not know, but Kevlar fiber is widely known for its impressive tensile strength. Compared to other materials like Nylon, it has a better cut resistance technology. These materials are often integrated into the glove’s stitching.

Nylon

Since Nylon is a ballistic material, you can expect it to offer extra durability and abrasion resistance. Based on our tests, we also noticed that it’s a material often found in the inner glove. 

TPR

Thermoplastic Rubber or TR materials are made of plastic and rubber components. Thanks to this, it can protect you from operational impact. 

Despite its lightweight construction, it’s thick enough to stop chainsaw operations amid accidental contact. 

Spandex

True to its name, spandex is quite a stretchy material. Due to this, it’s used on the back part of the gloves or around the wrist area. Typically, these materials would go with a knitted inlet that makes the gloves comfy and secure.

Goatskin

You may notice that most of the options we included are made of goatskin. The main reason for this is its higher than normal cut resistance. It also absorbs moisture so you wouldn’t be distracted due to your sweaty palms.  

Hydrophobic

Hydrophobic cloth is a water-resistant material. It means that it can repel water (or oil) during usage. These components are popular in various work gloves because it boosts hand safety and comfort. 

High-Visibility

Your gloves must be highly visible while working with a sharp cutting tool, so buying ones with bright colors should be safer. It can help you stay safe when working at night.

Resistance to Cuts

Regardless if the gloves are specifically made for chainsaw usage, you’ll notice on their label if it’s punctured or cut-resistant. If you see this feature, it means that the gloves you’ll buy include a component that will stop sharp tools from piercing into their surface.

Protective Features

Since you’re dealing with a sharp and powerful cutting tool, your gloves must have protective reinforcement. Suppose the product has Kevlar or Kevlar or UHMWPE material. In that case, it can immediately halt chainsaw operations in case of sudden blade contact.

Comfort and Flexibility

You may think that thicker gloves equate to safer operations, but did you know that they can also compromise your comfort and flexibility? To ensure it won’t happen to you, consider buying gloves with breathable fabric like goatskin. 

Grip and Cuffs

Your glove’s grip can be jeopardized by water, dust, or oil buildups, so your gear needs water-resistance at the very least. 

On top of that, the glove’s cuff must be tightly secured to your wrist to avoid any slip-ups. If you ask us, buying knitted or Velcro varieties are highly recommended. 

EN and ANSI & ISEA Certification

Like any other gear used in major tool operations, gloves sold in the market must pass specific safety certifications. Not all products can withstand cuts, wear, and tear, so we suggest considering these standards before any purchase to avoid using subpar gloves.

EN and ANSI Safety Standards

Based on common manufacturing standards, every piece of safety equipment is categorized under EN Standard (European Union) and ANSI Standard (American National Standards Institute). 

These ratings are earned depending on where the manufacturers want their gloves sold. 

EN 381-7 Standard

This certification is crucial as it determines how your gloves will fair in stopping the chainsaw at different operational speeds. 

EN 381-7 Classifications Chart

Class TypeChain Speed Rating
Class 016 m/s
Class 120 m/s
Class 224 m/s
Class 328 m/s

EN 388 Standard

For this standard, the gloves will be tested based on their resistance to tears, cuts, punctures, etc. 

EN 388 Rating Chart

Test TypePerformance Scale
 12345
Abrasion-Resistant (in Cycles)10050020008000N/A
Cutting Resistance (in Cycles)1.22.551020
Tear Resistant (in Newton’s)10255075N/A
Puncture Resistance2060100150N/A

ANSI/ISEA 105-2000 Standard

This US standard indicates your gloves’ resistance to different occurrences and elements like cuts, abrasion, high heat, cold, chemicals, and even flames.

ANSI/ISEA 105-2005 Rating Chart

Test TypePerformance Scale
 123456
Abrasion-Resistant (in Cycles)100500100030001000020000
Cutting Resistance (in Cycles)200500100015004500N/A
Puncture-Resistant102060100150N/A

Customer Experience

Lastly, don’t forget to check feedback from first-hand users. These features may look fancy and impressive, but what matters most is how they perform in actual usage. 

Are Chainsaw Gloves Necessary?

Yes, you need to wear gloves made specifically for chainsaw use. It is a piece of quintessential safety equipment for chainsaw operation as it will protect your hands and prevent serious injury

How Do Chainsaw Gloves Protect You While Working?

Did you know that chainsaw gloves have more than one layer to protect you from potential chainsaw injury? Here’s the layered design your purchased gloves should have. 

Outer Glove Layer

The outer layer must be durable enough to prevent damage to the glove’s inner part. These layers must resist external hazards from cuts, abrasion, etc. 

Inner Glove Layer

This glove part is often filled with loose fibers, making them the perfect protection from chain engagement. Typically, these layers are made with Kevlar or Nylon materials.

More Chainsaw Safety Protective Equipment

Your hands aren’t the only body part you should protect when using chainsaws. We suggest wearing the following gear to avoid unprecedented accidents during the cutting operation.

Chainsaw Safety Tips

It’s a no-brainer, but we’d like to reiterate that you should never start a chainsaw while it’s close to any of your body parts. It’s also wise not to stand right behind the saw as the kickback may cause you injuries.

FAQ

Which variety of gloves is best when using a chainsaw?

Gloves resistant to cuts, punctures, hot & cold temperatures, and water are the best ones to use when using a chainsaw. 

Do chainsaw gloves stop a chainsaw?

Yes, chainsaw gloves can stop chainsaw operations via protective reinforcements.

Will you need water-resistant gloves when using a chainsaw?

Yes, gloves should be able to absorb water and moisture to avoid chainsaw slippage and uncomfy usage.

Our Top Pick For a Pair of Chainsaw Gloves:
Oregon Chainsaw Left-Hand Protection Leather Gloves

The best chainsaw gloves should comply with safety standards like the ones we tested from the Oregon brand. It’s not as expensive as other options, but it carries enough protective reinforcement to ensure your hands are safe during chainsaw mishaps. 

The Oregon Left-Hand Protection Leather Gloves are also comfortable to use, making the cutting operations efficient and productive.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson

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