What is the Best Chainsaw Helmet? For Forestry, Logging & More (2022)

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When operating a chainsaw, one of the most important things to remember is to wear personal protective equipment. A chainsaw is a dangerous tool that can sever or injure you if you do not handle it properly. 

Thus, we should never cut corners when it comes to safety. In this article, we will share the best chainsaw helmets on the market.

Premium Option
Stihl 7010-871-0199
Editor’s Choice
Pfanner Protos
Budget Option
Husqvarna ProForest
Stihl Woodcutter
Pfanner Protos
Husqvarna ProForest
• Lightweight
• Easy to use
• 22dB protection
• Built-in vents
• High-quality
• 26dB protection
• Built to last
• Great ventilation
• 6-point suspension
• UV protection
• Rain shield
• 25dB protection
Premium Option
Stihl 7010-871-0199
Stihl Woodcutter
• Lightweight
• Easy to use
• 22dB protection
• Built-in vents
Editor’s Choice
Pfanner Protos
Pfanner Protos
• High-quality
• 26dB protection
• Built to last
• Great ventilation
Budget Option
Husqvarna ProForest
Husqvarna ProForest
• 6-point suspension
• UV protection
• Rain shield
• 25dB protection

Reviews of the Top Chainsaw Helmets

1. Pfanner Protos Integral Arborist Helmet

This safety helmet is among the most costly on the market, but it is also one of the safest and most comfortable options. It is one of the top chainsaw helmets built by arborists who understand what elements make up a superb helmet.

It is a tight fit that is adjustable to match different head sizes. The inside mesh of the headgear protects your head if you take a tumble or are hit by debris.

Its high visibility and safety are both enhanced by its vivid color scheme. The Ptfanner Protos Integral Arborist Helmet is also easy to relocate or take out entirely to suit a variety of tasks and settings.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

2. Stihl 7010-871-0199 ProMark Forestry Helmet System

The construction industry relies on Stihl’s equipment, and the firm always has its customers’ health and safety in mind. This Stihl 7010-871-0199 ProMark Forestry Helmet System has all the features that make it a top choice among safety helmets.

They are lightweight, inexpensive, and well-made. It has a robust visor and ear muffs to keep debris from flying in your face when you use a chainsaw or other machinery. The design of this Stihl helmet is straightforward to put together and maintain, with easy replacement parts in case of damage.

The visor shields eyes and ears from debris from chainsaw use or weed wacker’s blade. Overall, it’s a fully protective helmet system we recommend for homeowners and professionals alike. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

3. Husqvarna ProForest Chainsaw Helmet

Husqvarna is a well-known manufacturer of high-quality tools for the logging industry. The same may be said with this safety helmet. The Husqvarna ProForest helmet can protect your head from the elements and other workplace dangers. 

It has a steel mesh visor and safety features for handling chainsaws and brush cutters. When the weather worsens, the rain guard will prevent water from dripping down your back while you continue working. It’s a great perk that makes a difference but frequently gets unnoticed.

This Husqvarna chainsaw helmet is a universal size, so it should suit most people. Its face visor and ear muffs are top-notch safety features for utilizing a chainsaw.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

4. Stens Protective Chainsaw Helmet

The Stens Protective Chainsaw Helmet’s steel mesh visor shields the wearer’s eyes and ears from debris thrown by a chainsaw or weed wacker’s blade. This helmet carries ANSI-compliant earmuffs. 

It is a safe, all-around minimal maintenance helmet with a fair price tag and is well-built, providing dynamic protection. Surprisingly, it has a ratchet adjustment function that allows for quick sizing changes, making it suitable for a wide range of head circumferences. 

This safety helmet is fully adjustable to suit someone as little as 5’2″ with a tiny head or as tall as 6’4″ with a large head. This protective helmet has certain sizing restrictions, but it should fit most people.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

5. Oregon 563474 Chainsaw Helmet Combo

The Oregon 563474 is among the long-lasting helmets on the market today. The components are more robust and equipped with the necessary safeguards than most models. 

Because of its lightweight design and 6-point adjustment system, it is perhaps the most comfortable option. The main drawback is that it might be challenging to assemble for certain people, owing to misaligned pieces.

This particular safety helmet includes a six-point simple adjustable strap so you can get a customized fit. The finest protection comes from a helmet that fits tightly on your head. It also has a large visor constructed of steel mesh and is equipped with enough ventilation holes. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

6. PETZL Vertex Helmet

We found the Petzl Vertex Chainsaw Safety Helmet more suitable for forestry experts who will be climbing trees or operating on the ground intensively, so although it is ranked lower than the others on the list, it is still a good choice.

Petzl, a French firm, has made climbing helmets for many years. They are a reliable manufacturer of climbing equipment, and their helmets may be worn with confidence even while working high in a tree and risk injury from falling branches.

This helmet may be upgraded for use in the wilderness with the addition of various accessories. A hard helmet, face protection, and earplugs work together to provide a comfortable and protective ensemble.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

7. TR Industrial Forestry Helmet

In addition to being very inexpensive, this helmet has a solid reputation for both safety and value. It’s a piece of 5-in-1 safety equipment produced from recyclable polymers, which will keep you covered while conducting various forestry-related tasks.

The TR Industrial Helmet is a reliable protective headgear option for people who are just starting. It will keep you protected and at ease if you plan to undertake a lot of tree maintenance on your own.

Additionally, it has earmuffs that are fitted to the helmet and will give the necessary protection for your ears. They meet all mandatory safety regulations and may be easily removed if necessary.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

Chainsaw Helmet Buyer’s Guide

Type of Project

It can be challenging to determine the best chainsaw helmet for you, particularly if you are unsure about your needs. Thus, you must first determine the type of task you will be doing.

The popular belief that helmets aren’t necessary for house repairs is untrue. Your head needs to be shielded from any falling limbs or branches.

Something more robust and equipped with visors, vents, and additional protection, is required if you want to work in the woods. The key to selecting the proper head protection is realizing the nature of your work.

Weight

A reliable, protective, and sturdy helmet is quintessential. On the contrary, it shouldn’t be so bulky that it slows you down even as you work for hours. 

You don’t want to strain your neck unnecessarily, so be aware of the load and pick a carrying method accordingly. A tip is to look at chainsaw helmet reviews to determine its real helmet features and how bulky or heavy it is.

Visors

Your eyes are always at risk from moving machines and flying debris. You don’t want sawdust or sticks in your face, so look for a helmet with a shield to protect your vision.

It is typical to have anti-fog goggles, hinged visor, or double visors with a clear plastic base and a mesh made of plastic or metal to provide additional eye protection from flying debris. Look for a visor that can be lifted or removed if you wish to see more clearly.

Types of Visor

A chainsaw helmet may accommodate a few distinct varieties of visors. It is a standard chainsaw helmet equipment that prevents sawdust from getting into your face. You won’t notice any significant change in your ability to see, so you may continue working as usual.

Manufacturers use metal or sturdy plastic to create mesh visors. You can use either of them, so don’t fret if your helmet already has a plastic visor because plastic visors provide shielding just like metal visors.

Attachable transparent visors for helmets are readily available. As good as the mesh visor keeps debris out of your face, these solid visors are better. There are no pinprick-sized openings so that nothing can get through.

A visor with a solid front is often constructed of plastic and is less prevalent than a mesh visor. If you don’t want fogging in your line of sight, you can opt for mesh and plastic visors. 

Visors are so delicate that even your perspiration might cause issues. In that case, you may want to switch to the mesh visor instead. Think everything out carefully before making a final call.

Comfort and Flexibility

While it’s crucial to have a helmet that provides adequate protection, the comfort level is secondary. In general, helmets are sold as a “one-size-fits-most” option. It’s best to have a hard hat that you can adjust in circumference to fit snugly on your head.

A helmet that is easy on the head for lengthy periods can provide a more relaxed and stress-free workday. To avoid becoming too hot while working, getting a helmet with air holes is recommended.

Removable ear muffs and visors may also be available for some helmets. Additionally, there are helmets, like Neiko helmets, with a foam headband for a precise, snug fit. 

High-quality helmets also have safety glasses, and a convenient dial knob makes adjustments easier to suit your needs better. It’s not a must-have function, but it’s something to consider.

Standards and Certifications

The best quality helmet should be ANSI, CE, or EN certified for chainsaw safety.

A helmet with ratings has undergone rigorous testing to guarantee safety and quality before being released to the public.

Different aspects of a durable helmet that has received ANSI and CE approval will result in different ratings but be assured that you will be well protected regardless of the grade.

Cost

Although it’s wise to keep costs in mind when looking for the best chainsaw helmet, you should always prioritize quality and dynamic protection. If you’re going to spend money on a helmet, spend it on one that provides superior features, ample protection, and comfort compared to the cheapest option.

You should shop around for the brand that will provide the longest and most reliable protection. A more expensive helmet often indicates that it provides greater protection or has more advanced technology for serious riders.

Why is it Important to Always Wear a Chainsaw Helmet?

A chainsaw helmet’s principal role is to shield the head from injury in the event of an accident. Helmets also frequently come with visors designed to shield your eyes from debris. 

Wearing eye protection is essential when operating a chainsaw. The visor is essential for keeping dust and particles from smashing into your face.

It’s safer to be protected than sorry, so always wear your helmet. There is a danger of injury when using a chainsaw. You may easily sustain a concussion or even worse if you try this. 

While many contemporary chainsaws have automatic shutoff mechanisms, you should still be wary of falling tree branches and other hazards.

FAQ

How long are chainsaw helmets good for?

Chainsaw helmets are good for three to five years, depending on how often it is used and the type of project you are working on. 

They are constantly bombarded by the elements, including UV rays [1], rain, car fumes, grime, and dust. Due to these factors, its plastic shell will ultimately break.

How do you put a chainsaw helmet together?

To put a chainsaw helmet together, start by installing the suspension straps first, then snap in your hearing protection. After that, insert the front shield that fits into the ear protection, and then insert the front guard or visor at the center front of the helmet.

Are safety helmets long-lasting?

After a certain amount of time has passed since it was manufactured, a safety helmet should be discarded and replaced with a new one. There’s a date carved onto the inside of the helmet. If there is no specified expiration date, you should plan on changing your helmet after three years. 

When is it time to replace a helmet?

If a safety helmet hasn’t been used in an industrial setting within three years of its manufacture date, it’s considered obsolete. As soon as the shell shows signs of wear and tear, you must change it. 

Look for the expiry date inside the helmet, but replace them if it’s already cracked or dented.

Our Top Pick For a Chainsaw Helmet:
Pfanner Protos Integral Arborist Helmet

Our team’s unanimous choice for the best chainsaw helmet for forestry, logging, or any other task is the Pfanner Protos Arborist Helmet. Its high-quality construction and excellent ventilation make up for its high price. 

It is safe for various environments, meets chainsaw safety requirements, including ANSI and EN standards, and gives better protection against back and side of the neck impacts.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson

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