The circular saw blades make smooth cuts, shock resistant, and have quiet operation. Without choosing the right blade, you won’t get any of the above and may leave you with a product that breaks within the first few uses. To save you from trouble, our team prepared a detailed review of the best circular saw blades for you.

Best Overall
DEWALT DWA161240 6-1/2-Inch 40-Tooth Circular Saw Blade
Best Premium Choice
Makita B-61656 7-1/4″ 24T Carbide-Tipped Max Efficiency Circular Saw Blade
Best Budget
IRWIN Tools MARATHON Carbide Corded Circular Saw Blade
DEWALT_DWA161240 No Background
Makita B-61656 Circular Blade Framing No Background
IRWIN Tools MARATHON Carbide No Background
A very well-known and reliable brand, Dewalt takes the top spot with its 40-tooth circular saw blade – the optimal balance between speed and efficiency. The circular saw blade has a thin kerf for a fine finish.
The Makita B-61656 has special raker teeth tipped with high-density carbide for extra resilience. It has a super-thin kerf and reduced swing width for less resistance when in use.
Safe and durable products can also come at cheap prices. The Irwin Tools Marathon Circular Saw Blade features a silicone coating that reduces resistance against the wood piece. The product also has heat expansion slots that will reduce vibrations.
Best Overall
DEWALT DWA161240 6-1/2-Inch 40-Tooth Circular Saw Blade
DEWALT_DWA161240 No Background
A very well-known and reliable brand, Dewalt takes the top spot with its 40-tooth circular saw blade – the optimal balance between speed and efficiency. The circular saw blade has a thin kerf for a fine finish.
Best Premium Choice
Makita B-61656 7-1/4″ 24T Carbide-Tipped Max Efficiency Circular Saw Blade
Makita B-61656 Circular Blade Framing No Background
The Makita B-61656 has special raker teeth tipped with high-density carbide for extra resilience. It has a super-thin kerf and reduced swing width for less resistance when in use.
Best Budget
IRWIN Tools MARATHON Carbide Corded Circular Saw Blade
IRWIN Tools MARATHON Carbide No Background
Safe and durable products can also come at cheap prices. The Irwin Tools Marathon Circular Saw Blade features a silicone coating that reduces resistance against the wood piece. The product also has heat expansion slots that will reduce vibrations.

Reviews of the Best Circular Saw Blades

1. Dewalt DWA161240 6-½-Inch 40-Tooth Circular Saw Blade

Dewalt has made it on our list again. This brand created a 40-tooth circular saw design and considered one of the best circular saw blade types for versatility and toughness. The entire blade is created from tungsten carbide for extra wear resistance and the anti-stick coating will fight blade friction against the material. 

The thin kerf is excellent for a smoother cut and finish, but the blade is still very strong and has a reinforced shoulder. The thinness of the Dewalt DWA161240 blade does not compromise durability due to the shoulder protecting against nail-embedded wood.

Pros

Cons

2. Makita B-61656 7-¼” 24T Carbide-Tipped Max Efficiency Circular Saw Blade

The Makita B-61656 may be at the higher price range, but it is worth the premium price if you consider what it offers. It is highly durable and excellent for framing materials. 

Its 24-tooth carbide-tipped blade provides users maximum efficiency. The alternate face with raker teeth gives the blade more power for smoother and accurate cuts. These blades can offer a woodworker up to 70% more speed than other circular saw blade options. 

The ultra-thin kerf with slim tip bottoms is ideal for furniture-grade cuts with lower resistance resulting in efficient and faster-cutting speed.

Pros

Cons

3. IRWIN Tools MARATHON Carbide Corded Circular Saw Blade

If the Makita blade is a bit too rich for your blood, our experts recommend the Irwin Tools Marathon Blade offering functional features for such a reasonably priced saw blade.

It’s easy and safe to use with a silicone coating that outfits the blade to slice through materials than any other power tools. The coating also reduces pitch and resin buildup.

The carbide teeth are durable and hard-wearing for large-scale construction jobs. Every other tooth on this best circular saw blade is thinner that can reduce cutting time. The blade also features heat vents that will eliminate vibrations.

Pros

Cons

4. Freud D0760A Diablo 7-1/4" x 60-Tooth Ultra Fine Finishing Circular Saw Blade

Freud Diablo blades are the top choices among woodworkers. They have blades with a different number of teeth suited for various cut jobs. Our experts chose the 60-tooth fine finishing option as the best circular saw blade from the brand.

With the blade’s teeth, even wet wood is no match for this blade. The super-thin kerf will also make the cut job smoother and faster, thus, reducing cut time.

The Freud D0760A Diablo Blade features a Perma-shield non-stick coating to protect you from friction and even kickback. Blades with larger teeth will chip thinner material such as plywood, but the D0760A will slice through it like butter.

Pros

Cons

5. Oshlun SBW-055036 5-1/2-Inch 36 Tooth ATB Finishing and Trimming Saw Blade

Aside from a circular saw, the Oshlun SBW055036 Circular Saw Blade is compatible with a variety of models like a table saw. The teeth are at an aggressive hook angle that makes the blade suitable for different types of lumber including softwood, hardwood, and plywood. 

The kerf, along with the hook angle, will create a more efficient and smoother cut extending the battery life and reducing cut time. 

For extra precision, the Oshlun SBW055036 circular saw blade features precision ground carbide tips for a surgical cut without any tear. Oshlun offers these saws in 3 different teeth counts to suit the user’s cutting needs.

Pros

Cons

6. BOSCH DCB624 Daredevil 6-1/2-Inch 24-Tooth Framing Ripping Corded/Cordless Circular Saw Blade

For framing and rip cuts, the Bosch DCB624 will not disappoint. Our team loved the variety of applications this circular saw blade could perform. The teeth are carbide-tipped with micro-grain formulation for extra wear resistance.

With ATB teeth, the DCB624 excels at cross-cutting and trimming plywood, hardwood, or softwood.

Coated with Bosch’s SpeedCoat, this saw is the top choice for less friction and heat prevention. The steel body of the blade is not only resilient but also delivers the most precise cuts, won’t bend, and stays sharper even for an extended period of use.

Pros

Cons

7. Freud D0740A Diablo 7-1/4 40 Tooth ATB Finishing Saw Blade

The next Freud Diablo option our experts chose is the D0740A ATB Circular Saw Blade. It definitely earns top points for robustness with carbide teeth that work on most lumber materials. The Freud exclusive TiCo high-density carbide is anti-vibration and prolongs the sharpness up to 4 times longer than regular blades.

The D0740A is also coated in Freud’s Perma-shield non-stick heat-resisting exterior. This 7-¼-inch circular saw blade would work with many different models and is covered by Freud’s lifetime warranty. 

The operation with a larger circular saw blade size could be noisy, but Freud ensures that it operates quietly using its thin laser-cut kerf.

Pros

Cons

Circular Saw Blade Buyer’s Guide

The number of teeth, the blade diameter, and whether or not the blade features laser teeth are all factors you need to contend with to find the top product. Don’t worry if you won’t understand what laser-cut stabilizer vents are because our experts are here to break down the different features to look for when buying the best circular saw blade.

Blade Size and Dimensions

The first thing to look at is the lumber material you are cutting through and your saw size. Our experts say the sizing is quite diverse, ranging from 7 inches to 14. Handheld circular saws will go for a smaller kind of blade, while full-sized options require a larger type – typically around 10-12 inches.

The smaller the size, the smaller scale the job should be. It will take a 7-inch blade twice as long to cut through hardwood as it would take a 10-inch blade.

Compatibility

Aside from the size, you have to make sure the blade you choose is compatible with the brand of power tool you have, the project type, and the type of saw. The manufacturer will usually list the brands the blades can work well with. Our experts say the project type and the type of circular saw are more important.

For the type of saw, you need to look at the arbor size and the shaft of your saw to ensure the right fit. The type of cut you want to make will also impact the type of blade you choose. For example, if you are looking to cut dadoes and grooves, go for a dado blade.

To help you pick the best circular saw blades, our team will list the different types of blades to choose from and what they are most suited for.

Flat top grind or FTG blades are powerful, great for rip cuts, but aren’t very precise. ATB or alternate top bevel blades are the top choices for general purpose use, and hi-angle ATB blades offer a higher bevel angle than their counterparts and are the premium option for smooth lines on laminate or engineered lumber materials.

Lastly, there are TCG blades or the triple chip grind. They are tough and suited for most materials; however, our team reminds you that triple chip grind blades are not fit for general woodworking and better used on metals, concrete forms, and thicker lumber.

Blade Material and Coating

The blade material is imperative to the lifespan of the blade. Our experts say the superior blades are either steel with carbide teeth or have the entire body made from tungsten carbide. 

For steel, you may have a choice between carbon steel blades, high-speed steel or HSS blades, and cobalt steel blades. 

Carbon steel is what our experts recommend you choose for softer materials such as plastics. Carbon steel blades are the softest among all of the steel options and the most affordable. However, because carbon steel is softer, these blades have more flexibility and tension resistance.

HSS blades do what the name suggests and are made to handle high speeds. In order to withstand the high spins, these blades are extra-durable. They are a harder version of steel and retain their sharpness long. 

They also have better temperature resistance with or without protective coating. MDF and hardwood materials are no match for HSS blades, which makes them a good choice for workers who often use these materials.

Then we have the cobalt steel blades, which our experts recommend for the toughest jobs. They earn their name because of trace amounts of cobalt, which makes them even more robust than HSS blades. Like the HSS, cobalt blades also retain their sharpness and have high-temperature resistance.

For someone who often works with aluminum, copper, and different types of metal aside from wood, then cobalt steel blades are our experts’ top choice for you. However, there is a drawback. Because cobalt steel blades are not flexible, it makes them more prone to breaking and snapping. 

These blades and the ones with a full carbide body can feature carbide-tipped teeth. Regardless of the number of teeth, carbide-tipped teeth are generally more expensive and one of the best circular saw blades our experts recommend. If your budget allows, go straight for carbide tips as they are an excellent choice for lumber, nails, concrete forms, MDF, plywood, hardwood, and metals such as aluminum [1] material. 

Premium blades also come with coating or plating technology. These blades are extra tough and can withstand heat and friction on wood better than ones without the coating. Our experts say to look for a computer plate or laser cut anti-vibration vents to further stabilize the blade when in use.

Teeth

The teeth are also a lengthy category that features a lot for you to consider. For starters, to identify the right blade for the job you need to look at teeth count, hook angle, and design.

In general, the more teeth the saw has, the smoother the cut. This makes 60-tooth blades more precise than ones with only 24. Aside from the smooth cuts, a higher teeth count can also deliver more precise cuts. To help you identify the right tooth count for you, our team has put together this quick guide.

Saw blades with 40 teeth or below are suited for framing and ripping. Ones with 40-60 teeth are still considered coarse blades and are excellent for lumber, MDF, softwood, and regular hardwood material.

Blades with a TPI of 8-18, which means they have 60-80 teeth are suited for all of the above materials plus sheet metals and plywood.

To be considered a fine tooth circular saw blade, it has to be around 80-120 teeth. Fine-toothed circular saw blades are mostly used for plywood, non-ferrous metals, and a variety of sheet materials. 

For a general-purpose combination blade, then our team suggests a fewer number of teeth ranging from 14-20. Our experts also suggest outfitting your work area with different types of blades for your circular saw that is easy to switch out for various projects.

Changing Circular Saw Blades

To switch out the saw blades, make sure to power off your equipment and remove the battery if you have a cordless option. Next, press the arbor switch down and rotate the blade until the locking mechanism kicks in. 

A blade wrench was most likely included in your purchase, so use it to remove the arbor nut and carefully remove the blade. Place the new blade in the arbor but make sure the teeth are facing the right direction. Then replace the arbor nut and tighten it again with the blade wrench.

How to Properly Maintain a Circular Saw Blade

The maintenance of a circular saw blade will have an impact on its lifespan. One way to ensure it will always work at optimal levels is by cleaning it properly. The circular saw blade should only be cleaned when it is removed from the saw. You can use regular detergent or mild soap. Start by finding a large enough receptacle and diluting the detergent or soap of your choice with warm water.

Place the blade inside the solution for 5-10 minutes. The blades are easier to clean when all the dirt and grime have been soaked through. Grab a soft-bristled brush and start to brush the surface of the saw and the teeth of the blade gently. When you are done, rinse the blade in clean water and dry it off with a soft cloth.

Our team stresses not to hold the product by the teeth. Instead, thread your finger through the middle hole when cleaning for stability and balance.

FAQ

What is the best saw blade for a circular saw?

The best saw blade for a circular saw is the Dewalt DWA161240. This blade has the right number of teeth to work for most projects, and it is created from high-density carbide for the utmost durability. The slim kerf will offer a smooth cut from the blade, and the reinforced shoulder will reduce impact resistance.

Is more teeth on a circular saw blade better?

Yes, more teeth on a circular saw blade are better for work that requires a smoother and precise cut. More teeth will work better on thicker lumber and are suited for metal and sheet material, as well. However, a blade with more teeth will have less ripping power.

What is the best circular saw blade to cut plywood?

The Freud D0760A Diablo is the best circular saw blade to cut plywood. A higher number of teeth is best for thinner wood material. The fine-tooth thin kerf blade will also offer a more precise and clean cut on any sheet material such as aluminum and copper.

How do I choose a circular saw blade?

You choose a circular saw blade by thinking of the material you work with, the kind of cut you want to create, the tooth count, safety features, and the type of product you have. All of these factors will contribute to finding the best option for you.

Our Top Pick For a Circular Saw Blade: DEWALT DWA161240

Our experts decided on the Dewalt DWA161240 as the best product on this review guide. The blade is constructed with high-density carbide for longer wear resistance. The exterior of the blade is coated with an anti-stick coating which will reduce friction during operation. Given the thin kerf design, the Dewalt DWA161240 will provide a smooth cut and precise finish.

For accurate measure and accurate cuts, you can also use the best circular saw guides we reviewed here

Robert