A corded drill can do so much more than just drill holes – if you get the right one. You won’t need to worry about running out of juice and can tackle hardwood without issue, but only if you know which to get. Our woodworking team has plenty of corded drills on-hand and have picked the best ones to do the job right.

Premium Pick
Milwaukee GIDDS2-811760
Editor’s Choice
Ridgid R7111
Budget Option
BLACK+DECKER DR260C
Milwaukee GIDDS2-811760
Ridgid R7111
BLACK+DECKER DR260C
• For heavy-duty work
• Ratcheting keyless chuck
• Soft grip handle
• Trigger speed control
• Heavy-duty keyed chuck
• 2-finger trigger
• 8 amps
• 360-degree aux handle
• Affordable option
• Variable speed
• On-board bit storage
• Compact design
Premium Pick
Milwaukee GIDDS2-811760
Milwaukee GIDDS2-811760
• For heavy-duty work
• Ratcheting keyless chuck
• Soft grip handle
• Trigger speed control
Editor’s Choice
Ridgid R7111
Ridgid R7111
• Heavy-duty keyed chuck
• 2-finger trigger
• 8 amps
• 360-degree aux handle
Budget Option
BLACK+DECKER DR260C
BLACK+DECKER DR260C
• Affordable option
• Variable speed
• On-board bit storage
• Compact design

Reviews of the Top Corded Drills for Woodworking

1. Ridgid R7111

The Ridgid R7111 is a ½-inch corded drill with an impressive 8-amp motor for all your heavy-duty needs. The gears are made from hardened steel not only to promote longevity, but also to exact specifications as accurately as possible.

The keyed chuck is an all-metal design that will hold the bits more securely and add even more durability to the corded drill. The soft and ergonomic handle has a soft handle to reduce fatigue and its intuitive 2-finger trigger will give users full-range control over the speed of the machine. 

For more control, the Ridgid R7111 has a 360-degree auxiliary handle that can be easily adjusted or removed. 

Pros

Cons

2. Milwaukee GIDDS2-811760

The GIDDS2-811760 Milwaukee cordless drill is a hybrid design of plastic and metal, bolstered for heavy-duty applications. The keyless chuck is all metal and ratcheting to bring even more bit retention.

The GIDDS2-811760 corded drill will give users much more range thanks to the longer and super flexible Quick-Lok cord. Go from 0 to 850 RPM quickly while not losing control over the speed with the trigger speed control, the drill will feel like an extension of your arm rather than a separate tool.

The drill weighs in at just under 6 pounds, which will definitely reduce hand fatigue over time. 

Pros

Cons

3. BLACK+DECKER DR260C

This corded drill for woodworking does not need to cost close to 200, because the Black+Decker DR260C performs just as well as many of the other models on our list but for less than half the price.

It is smaller and more compact, but the drilling speed is still blazing fast at 1500 RPM. The 5.2 amp motor ensures the DR260C can drill into a wide variety of materials, making it a very versatile device. Of course, this best corded drill also comes with a variable speed trigger and the design gives you a much longer runtime than a cordless one. 

Pros

Cons

4. DEWALT VSR DWD112

This DeWalt corded drill has an amazing drill speed of 2500 RPM, enough to tackle thicker and tougher materials. As one of the best corded drills, the DeWalt DWD112 has an all-metal ratcheting keyless chuck that retains the bit very well. 

It’s a relatively lightweight drill if you think about how much power the DWD112 affords you, which gives you plenty of versatility for different applications, especially with the variable speed control. 

The corded drill comes with a 3-year limited warranty and a 90-day satisfaction guarantee, so you can rest assured the durable drill is protected. 

Pros

Cons

5. ENEACRO 1-1/4 Inch SDS-Plus

The Eneacro 1-1/4 inch corded drill is a 1-¼-inch rotary hammer drill design with a safety clutch and vibration control. The speed goes up to 880 RPM, and it comes with a very impressive 12.5-amp industrial strength motor. The ENEACRO drill is tough enough to drill concrete and metals while keeping your wrist protected from high torque.

The adjustable handle will give you a better grip and the corded drill for woodworking also has upgraded vibration control to give you a steadier hold of the device. Don’t worry about fatigue, because the soft grip will take care of that.  

Pros

Cons

6. PORTER-CABLE PC600D

The Porter-Cable PC600D is one of the most recommended drills from our experts. It’s fast, looks edgy, and comes with a 6-amp motor that can handle the most demanding applications. It has a ⅜-inch keyless chuck and the Porter-Cable corded drill can go from 0 to 2500 RPM with the variable speed trigger that gives you full control.

The PC600D has a lock-on switch that makes it easier to handle for longer projects and keeps it stabler for prolonged use. The corded drill for woodworking is considered and is a lightweight yet powerful corded drill.  It is compatible with most hole saw kits and gets the job done without tiring out your arm. 

Pros

Cons

7. DEWALT DWD220

Our construction experts also added the DWD220 DeWalt corded drill to the list for its variable speed reversible function, anti-lock control, and 10.5-amp motor that makes it one of the most powerful corded drill options today. Since its motor is so powerful, the drilling power makes the DeWalt DWD220 more suited for heavy-duty tasks rather than drill driving.

Users can comfortably drill on the job without feeling any fatigue, thanks to the softer grip and 2-finger trigger. The patented DeWalt motor within the DWD220 delivers 50% higher power and has increased overload protection. 

Pros

Cons

8. DEWALT DWD215G

Another good corded drill is the Dewalt DWD215G. It’s just slightly less powerful than the option above with a 10-amp motor, but it also features the patented DeWalt design that generates more power and provides more protection for the device.

The DWD215G features an all-metal keyless chuck with an automatic spindle lock and the grip design will give users a better balance and hold of the electric drill. The speed ranges from 0 to 1250 RPM, which increases the versatility for a variety of applications.

The 360-degree side handle will add even more support while you’re going at full drilling power.

Pros

Cons

9. VonHaus Heavy Duty Drill

Need to drill large holes and mix liquids? Then look no further than the VonHaus Heavy Duty Corded Drill for woodworking. It was designed with a no-load speed of 700 RPM, and the larger ½-inch chuck can hold larger drill bits. The drill also has variable speeds with a 360-degree handle for more flexibility and the drill also features a forward and back lock-on button.

It doesn’t matter which hand is dominant as the VonHaus corded drill works with both. The aluminum gear housing will ensure the powerful drill lives up to its name as one of the best corded drills. 

Pros

Cons

10. Milwaukee 0240-20

Our experts included the 0240-20 Milwaukee corded drill on our list for its powerful 8-amp motor and the perfect balance between speed and torque from 0 to 2800 RPM. The Milwaukee drill is excellent for drilling and fastening, while maximizing grip comfort and ergonomic form factor with a 2-finger trigger and soft handle.

The all-metal case protects the drill while it handles the toughest of applications. It will not lose power as it’s a corded electric drill, so you can even take it to the surface of concrete to really experience what the 0240-20 can do. 

Pros

Cons

Corded Drills for Woodworking Buyer’s Guide

As our woodworking experts mentioned in the beginning, corded models can do more than just drill holes, but how do you make sure the unit you are getting can manage the tasks while maintaining its performance and your comfort? Is it the soft rubber handles or keyed chucks? Our team will tell you what to want in the best corded drills for woodworking.

Size and Weight

The first criteria to look for is the size and weight of the corded drill for woodworking. These factors will determine how long you can operate the drill before fatigue sets in, how comfortable it is to grip, and even the power it carries and the tasks it can perform.

A larger and heavier corded drill will be very difficult to maneuver, so you should find ones that are lightweight. However, our construction team says overly lightweight corded units could indicate plastic components, which means less durability.

You should find a lightweight model, but pay attention to the material for necessary parts. For example, an all-metal keyed chuck or keyless option will be more robust than one that isn’t. 

You should also consider the size, because if you are mainly working in cramped spaces and within cupboards, you don’t want to drag a large and heavy model with you. Our experts remind our readers that what’s considered “lightweight and compact” will be different for everyone. 

Our experts generally found corded drills around 4 to 6 pounds are the best ones to maneuver while having enough power, torque, and general strength for all types of jobs.

Handle Comfort

Aside from the size and weight of the best corded drill, the handle comfort also affects the runtime. Look for an ergonomic design with soft grips or rubber handles. Most of the corded drills our team suggested have a secondary 360-degree handle that adds to the support and stability.

The extra handle not only gives you more control, but it also ensures more accuracy and a better hold during high pressure jobs such as mixing concrete or drilling metal. It may not matter during short tasks, but the handle comfort and presence of an auxiliary handle will make a huge difference in the long run for arm fatigue.

Power

Corded options are generally more powerful than cordless options. Before spending your hard-earned money on what you perceive to be the best corded drill, think about your projects and jobs. 

How much power do you need? Look at the amperage rating of the motor on corded drills. For corded units, you will likely find anywhere between 5 to 12 amps, with some a little over and some a little under.

If you’re looking for the top corded drill for woodworking only, a 5 amp motor will do just fine. However, for users who need to face off with concrete walls and such, you will need at least a 7-amp model or above. For those who are professional construction workers like some members of our team, corded drills that have industrial strength and 10 to 12 amps are the best. 

Torque and Variable Speed

What is the torque on the best corded drill? It’s the tightening force of your device, and it is very important if you’re looking at how well your unit performs on thicker and tougher materials. It is usually measured in NM (Newton Meters) [1], and the higher the number the better.

The speed, which is usually depicted in RPM (Revolutions Per Minute), is how fast the drill chuck rotates in one minute. The higher the number, the faster and more efficient the corded drill will be. The right RPM and torque will also depend on the material you work with. 

We suggest looking for variable speed functions, so you can customize and adjust the torque and speed of your unit to suit different operations. 

Ease of Use

How easy is it to use the drill for woodworking? Does it come with a bunch of confusing knobs, buttons, and switches, or is it user-friendly with clearly labeled components? All of the above features also contribute to the ease of use, so make sure you get one that’s properly weighted, fast, and powerful enough for you.

Chuck Size

The size of the drill, which could be ½ inches, ⅜ inches, and more, refers to the size of the chuck. The chuck is the part of the best corded drill that holds the bit. It needs to be secure, or you will be looking at slipping chucks, and it also needs to make drill bit changes easy and hassle-free.

You can find keyed or keyless chucks on a drill for woodworking, and keyless ones are what our team members suggest for the simplest bit switches. You won’t need a tool, or a key to operate them, but keyed chucks are much stronger, and provide a more secure grip of the bit.

The size also matters, because various sized bits will perform different functions and hold differently sized bits. Find what type of drill bits you need to determine the right size of the chuck for your drill.

Material Durability

From the shell to the various components on your best corded drills, users should only look for top-of-the-line materials. This will make sure your drill for woodworking will last for years to come. However, it’s common to find corded drills for woodworking that are made up of both metal and plastic parts. 

Many people have the misconception that plastic parts are automatically bad. Our experts say this isn’t necessarily true. All you would need to do is to make sure the plastic parts are not the necessary ones, or areas that see a lot of wear. 

Your drill goes head to head with wood, metal, and even concrete, which is why it needs to be crafted from even stronger materials to withstand heavy-duty applications.

Other Functions

The best corded drills for woodworking can do more than just drill simple holes. Many of the models our experts have suggested can hammer, chisel, mix, and even reverse. It all depends on the drill bit and the design of the drill. Of course, not everyone needs a myriad of functions, especially since it may cost more. 

If your purpose for purchasing a drill for woodworking is to only handle holes in wood, then there is no reason to shell out more money to have a hammer drill. Then again, you never know when you will need these extra functions.

Look for a drill with a hammer capability if you often deal with harsh materials, and the chisel and mix features are great if you deal with smaller materials or even liquids. However, the one function our experts recommend a drill for woodworking has is the reverse feature.

It’s basically the capability to reverse rotate the bit in the other direction, which is very useful when your drill gets stuck or you need to screw something in counter-clockwise. Another very useful feature is onboard bit storage, which keeps all the pieces together. 

Corded vs Cordless Drills

There are two types of drills for woodworking on the market – the corded or cordless drill. Corded models are more powerful than their cordless and more portable counterparts, and they are also generally lighter weight because they do not have an onboard battery. 

You also won’t ever have to worry about running out of juice or get that pang of annoyance when you pick up your drill only to realize it’s out of charge. However, corded drills are limited by the cable, and they give less range of movement. This is a problem that can be fixed easily with an extension cord, but it can become a tripping hazard.

There is no debate about the portability of a cordless drill, which greatly outweighs that of a corded drill for woodworking, but you do need to keep an eye on the battery levels.

(If you are looking for affordable ways to polish your wood projects, you can consider making a DIY drum sander using our guidelines here

FAQ

Which has more power, corded or cordless drills?

In general, corded options are more powerful as they are connected to a power source. They are also lighter and easier to maneuver if you don’t count the cable. However, cordless drills have much more portability, although the price point is higher.

Which is the best drill you can use on wood?

If you are looking for an excellent drill for woodworking, look no further than the R7111 from Ridgid. It has a reversible design, heavy-duty all-metal chuck, and an incredible motor with 8 amps and a 2-finger trigger. Not only is it good enough for wood, but it can also handle other heavy-duty materials as well. 

Our Top Pick For a Corded Drill for Woodworking:
Ridgid 7111

The best corded drill for woodworking is the Ridgid 7111. The lightweight and heavy-duty drill that can reverse and features full-range speed control. It also has a 360-degree auxiliary handle for more support and added strength and durability with the all-metal design. It provides a comfortable grip as well so users won’t have to worry about strain. 

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Robert