What is the Best Hacksaw This 2023? Reviews and Buying Guide

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A hacksaw is a tried and tested hand tool for cutting rebar, pipes, and studs. But with all the models on the market, a handful can break at first use and can sever your hand or endanger others.

So, our tool experts have found and tested the best hacksaws durable enough to withstand all your day-to-day tasks. Find out which are worth buying in this guide:

Premium Option
DeWalt DWHT20547L
Editor’s Choice
Lenox Tools 12132HT50
Budget Option
Craftsman CMHT20138
DeWalt DWHT20547L
Lenox Tools 12132HT50
Craftsman CMHT20138
• Accurate cuts
• Steel frame
• Holds 330lbs tension
• 45-50° blade angle
• 50,000psi tension
• Stores up to 5 blades
• Rubberized handle
• Convertible
• For 225lbs tension
• 4.375 cutting depth
• For flush cuts
• Full-grip handles
Premium Option
DeWalt DWHT20547L
DeWalt DWHT20547L
• Accurate cuts
• Steel frame
• Holds 330lbs tension
• 45-50° blade angle
Editor’s Choice
Lenox Tools 12132HT50
Lenox Tools 12132HT50
• 50,000psi tension
• Stores up to 5 blades
• Rubberized handle
• Convertible
Budget Option
Craftsman CMHT20138
Craftsman CMHT20138
• For 225lbs tension
• 4.375 cutting depth
• For flush cuts
• Full-grip handles

Reviews of the Top Hacksaws

1. LENOX Tools High-Tension Hacksaw (12132HT50)

The Lenox High-Tension Hacksaw (12132HT50) is our favorite because it has all you can want in one. The I-beam frame of this hacksaw generates blade tensions of up to 50000 PSI, resulting in improved precision and speed. The frame is roomy enough to hold five spare blades.

The hacksaw is ergonomically sound and offers a clear view of the cutting surface. With a rubberized grip, this tool is a breeze to hold and operate. This device is useful in any weather, including damp and chilly conditions.

You can even turn this tool into a jab saw using a Lenox reciprocating blade. Overall, this hacksaw will make quick work of even the hardest materials.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

2. DEWALT Hack Saw, 5-in-1 (DWHT20547L)

The Dewalt DWHT20547L is a multipurpose hacksaw with five different uses. It’s a hacksaw, pistol grip jab, 45-degree saw, and a long-reach saw all in one.

We like that it has a fantastic blade-tightening technique that ensures the tool won’t wiggle about while using it. Sawing is effortless and precise because the tool can withstand the stress of up to 330 pounds. 

Thanks to the rubber coating, you can easily and comfortably hold onto the handle while wearing gloves. You can use it to make precise cuts in tight areas and flush cuts at either a 45- or 90-degree blade angle.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

3. CRAFTSMAN Hand Saw, 12-Inch Hacksaw (CMHT20138)

This Craftsman hacksaw is quite sturdy thanks to its metal frame, which can withstand stresses of up to 225 pounds. When working with heavy materials, you can easily and safely tighten this 12-inch hacksaw using its user-friendly blade tensioner to protect the blade. 

The hacksaw’s full-grip handle is also an additional point for its user-friendliness. Its blade can make incisions 4.375 inches deep. Because you can turn the blade from a 90-degree to a 180-degree handle, you can perform flush cuts.

The Craftsman CMHT20138 Hacksaw performs well, but it should be used for lighter tasks.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

4. Capri Tools 20105 12" Mini Hacksaw

The Capri Tools mini hacksaw is ideal for cutting tight spaces. Weighing in at around a pound, this tool is incredibly portable. Patented technology allows you to switch between a 10 and 12-inch blade.

Its aluminum construction makes it remarkably sturdy for its size. The tool’s ergonomic, non-slip, plush grip makes it easy to hold and work with for long periods. Also, powerful bi-metal was used to craft the saw’s blade.

The Capri Tools 20105 Hacksaw is a terrific tool because it’s practical, simple, and straightforward. It is so durable that you may use it in water. However, remember that this hacksaw is not built for sustained, rigorous use.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

5. Klein Tools 702-12 HackSaw

The lightweight aluminum construction and plush grips of the Klein 702-12 Hacksaw make it a pleasure to use. It’s sturdy, too. In addition, spare blades can be kept in the handle for easy access.

You’re getting the functionality of two tools in one with this multipurpose tool, as it features both a hacksaw and a reliable reciprocating saw blade.

(Know more about the uses of reciprocating saw here.)

The bi-metal construction of the blades ensures their longevity. The blade tension may be adjusted up to 30,000 PSI, allowing quick and accurate cutting. It can also be mounted at a 45-degree angle for use with flush cutters.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

6. BEETRO Hacksaw Frame Set

The Beetro Hacksaw Frame Set includes three hacksaw frames, a 12-inch saw, a 6-inch saw, and a 10-inch mini saw. Better yet, each hacksaw frame has room for two blades. All of them are built to last with high carbon steel and aluminum alloy.

The hacksaw’s ergonomic grip ensures the user’s safety and comfort while cutting. If you want to cut metal pipes, PVC pipes, and wood, it offers various blades for that. In fact, this tool is one of the best metal cutting saws you can use. 

We like that the 12″ hacksaw’s blade may be set at either 45° or 90° to suit various cutting tasks and can be easily adjusted. From our experience, the larger hacksaw is perfect for detailed work, while the smaller is handy for working in confined places.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

7. GreatNeck 100 12 Inch Adjustable Frame

The GreatNeck 100 is a versatile saw that can cut more than just bone despite its resemblance to a butcher’s bone saw. The frame is its best feature because it allows you to use either 10- or 12-inch blades.

The GreatNeck 100’s interchangeable blade frame allows you to use blades with different tooth counts, cutting depths, and widths for different applications.

The molded silicone grip gives a secure hold for more aggressive cutting, allowing you to quickly and efficiently sever thicker materials. Overall, everything about it is made with your convenience and strength in mind.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

Hacksaws Buyer’s Guide

Blade Type and Sharpness

All-Hard Blade

All-hard blades are constructed from tempered, hardened steel and come in a selection of lengths, and thread-per-inch (TPI) counts. They perform well while slicing through cast iron.

Superfine-Grade Blade

Typically ranging from 30 to 32 TPI, ultra-fine options are the best hacksaw blades for cutting delicate metal rods while producing clean, polished ends. These blades have such fine teeth that cutting will take more time.

Fine-Grade Blade

A fine-grade hacksaw blade, with 24–30 TPI, produces a smooth cut surface but can only be used for cutting small, thin pipes and bars due to the prolonged cutting time.

Medium-Grade Blade

While a blade with a TPI of 20–24 produces cleaner cuts on the tips of pipes and bars; this trade-off is offset by the fact that the material is sliced through more slowly. A hacksaw blade with a TPI of 24 is the most common since you can use it for various tasks.

Coarse-Grade Blade

These hacksaw blades range from 12 to 18 TPI, making them ideal for forcefully cutting across steel pipes or other metal objects. Yet, the low TPI can cause the cut surfaces to have jagged edges.

Adjustable or Fixed Frame?

A hacksaw with a fixed frame can only accommodate a single blade size, such as a 10- or 12-inch blade, while a frame that is adjustable allows you to change the length to accommodate various blade sizes. 

Blades can be secured with clamps, wing nuts, or pins on both hacksaws. However, even the most flexible hacksaws can only accommodate blades that are a few inches apart at most.

For instance, a hacksaw with an adjustable blade length of 10 inches can typically accommodate blades no longer than 12 inches. Typically, it cannot hold blades shorter than 8 inches. Nonetheless, some kinds can accommodate both long and short blades.

Tension

When cutting metal, it’s best to use a hacksaw with a blade that can withstand a lot of force so that it stays taut and doesn’t jiggle.

TPI

The greater the number of teeth per inch, the more delicately it can slice through delicate materials. For example, you’d want the fewest possible TPI to cut through a 1-inch thick piece of steel. [1]

Handle Ergonomics and Design

The most popular style of hacksaw handle is a pistol grip, which enables the operator to have a solid grip on the saw and provides more force to the cutting action. 

Some variants include a handle shaped like a stick and perpendicular to the saw blade, earning them the name “jab saw.” 

Padded or rubberized non-slip grips are common on both types of handles, making it easier to hold onto the handle without slipping and reducing user fatigue.

Regardless of the options, the grip should be big enough for a strong grasp for you to achieve the best outcomes.

Weight and Length

For prolonged use without fatigue, select a lightweight hacksaw. You’ll tire out quickly from slicing the PVC pipe or metal, but using a heavy hacksaw makes the process even more laborious.

Hacksaw blades can be anywhere from 10 to 12 inches long, but some more compact variants can use blades as small as 6 inches. Some models feature a blade extension that can be used as a jab saw when extended past the end. 

Durability and Versatility

Your hacksaw should be long-lasting and well-made. Ensure it is constructed with care and high-quality components.

You may find various hacksaws with varying degrees of versatility. Find out if your hacksaw may be transformed into a jab saw or other equipment.

If you can get two or more uses out of a single hacksaw, it’s a good investment.

Frames

While aluminum and aluminum alloy frames are available, a sturdy steel frame is a better value; for prolonged use without fatigue.

The 10-inch length is the most typical choice because it’s both short and strong. Having more than one hacksaw in your toolbox is ideal, but if you only have room for one, a 10-inch model is your best bet.

The hacksaw can be tilted with two rows of mounting pins for a more precise and expansive cut. The hacksaw’s skewed angle doesn’t affect the straightness of the cut, and it travels far further than it would with only two mounting pins.

Extra Features

Conversion Frame

Various hacksaws have an interchangeable frame that allows the user to switch between using the tool as a conventional hacksaw and a jab saw, which is essentially a reciprocating saw with the blade protruding forward. This facilitates access to hard-to-reach pipes.

High-Tension Adjustment

A strong blade is necessary for precise, clean cuts; some hacksaws feature a high-tension setting that pulls the blade extremely taut. Even yet, most blades require periodic readjusting since the act of sawing itself loosens them.

Blade Casing/Storage

Having a place to keep the blades handy when traveling is a nice bonus. When a saw has a place to store extra blades, it is usually in the frame itself, and you can push the blades from one end.

Uses of Hacksaws

Though they were made for cutting metal, hacksaws are now frequently used in do-it-yourself electrical and plumbing projects to slash through plastic pipes and conduits.

Cutting wood using a hacksaw is possible, but a handsaw is preferable.

How To Properly Use a Hacksaw

First, ensure the hacksaw blade is properly tensioned before using it for the first time. You shouldn’t risk damaging the knife’s edge right away.

To cut, the teeth of a hacksaw must move in the direction of motion, and more force must be applied during the pushing process.

Properly holding a hacksaw is crucial to making clean cuts in any material. The hand behind the knife should be in a pistol grip, with the index finger pointing down the length of the blade. The front of the frame needs to be where your leading hand is. 

As a result, additional force can be used at the outset of the cutting motion. You can slide both hands to the back of the frame when you’ve cut for maximum control.

The method by which you will hold the material you will be cutting is the last you should consider. There should be no wasted effort in moving your materials or workbench, even a millimeter.

It’s easy to adjust your cut with a hacksaw by simply shifting the frame in a different direction. In reality, the process is quite easy. You will only need to twist the blade, cutting it more heavily on one side than the other.

FAQ

Will my hacksaw blade get dull over time?

Naturally, hacksaw blades will dull over time, but modern high-speed steel ensures they retain their edge for much longer. Cutting at a rate of 40 to 60 strokes per minute is optimal for preserving the life of hacksaw blades.

Is it okay to use a hacksaw for cutting wood?

In an emergency, you can use a hacksaw to create cross-grain cuts in wood. However, it excels at cutting little objects like dowels and thin boards.

Where can I use a high-tension hacksaw?

Cutting through metal rods and pipes is a common application for both low- and high-tension hacksaws. On the other hand, high-tension hacksaws keep the sharp blades from bending by holding them at a greater tension, which speeds up the cutting process.

Can I use a hacksaw to cut nails?

Using a hacksaw to sever the nail between two contiguous boards is a traditional method for dismantling nailed wood furniture, crates, and other goods. You may need a coarse blade with an 18 TPI for this task.

Our Top Pick For a Hacksaw:
LENOX Tools 12132HT50 High-Tension Hacksaw

Our unanimous choice for the best hacksaw is the Lenox Tools 12132HT50. This saw was a delight to use because it weighed less than 2 pounds and had a supertight blade. 

In addition, you can put the blade in a straight or at a 45-degree angle. With these features, it breezed through every test stage we put it through.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson
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