What is the Best Miter Saw Blade for Trim? (2022)

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Good trim work needs a miter saw that could produce smooth cuts across the grain. However, not all tool blades have enough tooth count to achieve the perfect trimming output. 

So if you don’t want to end up dealing with rough cuts, check out our team’s recommendations on the best miter saw blade for trim projects. 

Premium Option
Forrest CM26905105 Chopmaster
Editor’s Choice
Freud D12100X
Budget Option
Metabo HPT 115435M
Forrest CM26905105 Chopmaster
Freud D12100X
Metabo HPT 115435M
• Long Blade Life: Submicron Carbide
• Blade Size: 260mm
• Heavy-duty Steel Plate
• Kerf: 7/64-inch
• Teeth: 90
• Laser-cut Stabilizer
• Teeth Count: 100
• Durable Carbide Material
• Design: Shear-face Grind
• Corrosion Resistant
• Maximum RPM: 5800
• Material Type: Tungsten
• Kerf: 0.094 inches
• Blade Type: Fine Finish
• Compatibility: Wood & Metal
Premium Option
Forrest CM26905105 Chopmaster
Forrest CM26905105 Chopmaster
• Long Blade Life: Submicron Carbide
• Blade Size: 260mm
• Heavy-duty Steel Plate
• Kerf: 7/64-inch
• Teeth: 90
Editor’s Choice
Freud D12100X
Freud D12100X
• Laser-cut Stabilizer
• Teeth Count: 100
• Durable Carbide Material
• Design: Shear-face Grind
• Corrosion Resistant
Budget Option
Metabo HPT 115435M
Metabo HPT 115435M
• Maximum RPM: 5800
• Material Type: Tungsten
• Kerf: 0.094 inches
• Blade Type: Fine Finish
• Compatibility: Wood & Metal

Reviews of the Top Miter Saw Blades for Trim

1. Freud D12100X

Despite being in the low price range, Freud D12100X caught our eyes with its shear-face grind design. You may not know, but this construction allows the delivery of seamless cuts even if the saw produces less amp rating. Using this blade on your miter saw offers less material waste and maximum cutting performance. 

Trimming is also an intricate task, so trust us when we say you’ll need a blade with less noise and vibrations. Fortunately for you, Freud D12100X has laser-cut stabilizer vents to prevent that.

This blade is compatible with 12-inch miter saws, and its 100 teeth count will surely give you a smooth cutting capacity. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

2. Forrest CM26905105 Chopmaster

At first glance, the feature that draws us into Forrest CM26905105 Chopmaster is its double-hard C-4 Submicron Carbide construction. Through this design, you can bet that this blade can last longer than its typical alternatives. 

It’s also one of the best miter saw blades for trim because it has a heavier steel plate than most blades. During our hands-on tests, it helps keep stability as we try to get the best cut during usage. 

It also features more teeth count and proprietary design, making the cutting operations quiet and smooth, ultimately leading to splinter-less output. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

3. Metabo HPT 115435M

Being out of budget doesn’t mean you’ll have to settle for substandard saw blades because Metabo HPT 115435M can be a reliable option despite its affordability. 

Users can expect this blade made of tungsten carbide to deliver long-lasting and durable performance. This fine finish blade suits different cutting applications and can handle materials like hardwood, softwood, plywood, MDF, etc. 

On top of all that, this blade has a thin kerf of 0.094 inches. Thanks to this, you’ll waste less wood during trimming and less strain on the saw head’s motor. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

4. Tenryu SL-305100

Given its flatter blade design, any woodworker would be pleased with Tenryu SL-305100’s clean and smooth cuts. And with its advanced vibration-dampening system, the stability of this blade could lead you to finish your tasks faster than you’d expect. 

It has ten resin-filled slots, making the dampening system more effective. During usage, we can attest that there are virtually no vibrations felt. 

If you look into their product line as we already did, you’ll notice that this option is more affordable than their other offerings. But despite that, the blade features a fair flat design. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

5. Freud LU79R012

Another reliable blade we tested for this round-up is Freud LU79R012. The feature that sets this blade apart from others is its non-stick coating. It lessens the chances of blade dragging, pitch buildup, and corrosion. 

It’s also designed with laser-cut anti-vibration slots, allowing the blade to achieve a smooth finish. 

We expected it to produce splinter-free cuts as the blade has a High Alternate Top Bevel design and a ninety-six tooth count that’s perfect for clean trims. On top of that, fewer vibrations during usage increase the blade’s life more than regular alternatives. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

6. DEWALT DW7650

It’s a no-brainer that good miter saw blades might come from reputable brands, so we couldn’t resist the urge to test DEWALT DW7650. This sharp component is engineered with an extra hard carbide material that keeps the blade’s edges sharp despite frequent usage. 

Our hands-on experience, this blade also proved its stability, thanks to its heavy-duty tempered steel plates. Through the balance brought by its weight, it delivers accurate cuts and tighter joints. 

If you inspect closer, it’s hard to ignore how its carbide teeth are constructed with fine-grit diamond wheels. Through this, each tooth can plane on the material smoothly.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

7. CMT 255.096.12

Besides miter saws, CMT 255.096.12 is also a great blade option for table and radial arm saws. And given that this blade has a kerf as thick as 0.110 and a plate thickness of 0.087, you can achieve a smooth glass finish when trimming solid wood materials. 

This blade’s heat expansion slots also prevent warping, often observed during extensive usage. Up close, you can see the tensioning ring on its surface that’s well-tuned to deliver the best cutting performance. 

Additionally, it features tri-metal brazing. Because of this component, the blade can handle high impact from hardwoods and composite materials. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

8. IRWIN Tools Marples Laser Cut

Another budget-friendly blade you can consider for your 12-inch miter saw is IRWIN Tools Marples Laser Cut. Despite its low price, it proved its superiority over regular blades with its heat-resistant, non-stick coating. It’s made of an aluminum matrix that’s great for dissipating heat and delivers neat cuts.

You can expect an extra fine cutting performance through this blade as it’s equipped with 80TPI, which is ideal for hardwood and softwood. 

Its carbide [1] teeth are also durable, so resharpening them multiple times wouldn’t make the blade dull immediately. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

9. Freud LU74R012

If you have a less powerful miter saw, a blade such as Freud LU74R012 with thin kerf construction will suit your needs. Despite requiring lower horsepower, it can deliver great cutting results. 

Its tooth design is Hi-Alternate Top Bevel, making it suitable for high-speed applications without risking the cut quality. 

Manufacturers of this blade equipped it with an exclusive Silver I.C.E. Coating, which reduces heat and buildup during usage. Thanks to this, corrosion and rust are also the least of your concern. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

Miter Saw Blades for Trim Buyer’s Guide

Size and Diameter

If you’re cutting a trim no more than an inch thick or 6 inches wide, buying 10-inch miter saw blades should suffice. 

However, our testers suggest using a 12-inch alternative when dealing with wider wood boards or other larger materials. Its size also offers more versatility regarding the projects you can handle.

Material and Coating

If you ask our experts, the best miter saw blade for trim should be coated with substances like titanium or carbide. As these metals go through high-speed operations, you must understand that they must be durable and strong. 

However, there’s no use in hard coating if your steel base is weak. If you want a long-lasting and high-performing blade, it’s a no-brainer that high carbon steel material is the answer. These components can slice through any wood or stone smoothly. 

Teeth Count

Even a newbie woodworker should know that the smoothest cuts come from blades with many teeth. This part of your blade does the actual cutting action, so it’s crucial to consider this feature. 

Typically, higher counts deliver finer finishes. However, it can be slower to cut than blades with fewer teeth. 

Type of Blade

When you shop for a miter saw blade, don’t forget to consider what type of tooth patterns your trim work requires. Here are the variations you may encounter along the way. 

ATB

It stands for Alternate Top Bevel, designed with alternating bevels between ten and twenty degrees. Most woodworkers use this blade for cross cuts, but it’s also known for its smooth and clean finish. 

ATBR

Alternate Top Bevel with Raker blades are constructed with five different tooth patterns. They also have a large craw, making them suitable for softwood and hardwood. 

Hi-ATB

High Alternate Top Bevel (Hi-ATB) is less likely to tear out than other tooth types. However, we don’t recommend them for regular usage as it gets dull quicker.

FTB

On the other hand, flat-top grind blades can eliminate wood chips and sawdust faster than you’d think. Its tooth pattern is the only blade type that produces a flat foundation during cutting. 

TCB

The purpose of triple chip grind blades is very specific: to lessen tooth dragging and chip circulation. It has a teeth pattern combination of leading and level raker. 

Kerf

Thinner kerf saw blades should be your go-to option if you’re cutting thin strips with your miter saw. 

This design could help lessen your tool’s motor strain with less material removal. However, we urge you to use full-kerf blades to get precise cuts on thicker materials. 

Thickness of the Plate

Upon our search, we discovered that saw blade plates come in two variations: 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick. The general rule is the thinner the plate is, the less material waste and sawdust it will produce. 

Hook Angle

There are two hook angles you should know when it comes to miter saw blades, the positive and the negative. You can expect more aggressive and faster cuts when you choose the former. However, it features less feeding pressure. 

Meanwhile, the latter produces slower scarp cuts and is under more pressure during feeding, but it lessens tear-out. 

RPM

The blade’s revolutions per minute (RPM) signifies its ability to cut heavy-duty materials. It will also offer better cut quality and control with higher RPM capacity. 

Heat Vents

As a power tool, your miter saw will produce heat that can potentially damage the blade—because of this, getting a blade with stabilizer vents is important.  

You’ll notice this feature in the form of lines and holes in the blade’s exterior. Thanks to these, the material won’t wrap, and it will produce less noise during usage.

Arbor

The arbor or the hole in the middle of your blade should match the requirements of your miter saw. Generally, 10-inch machines require a ⅝-inch arbor and 12-inch miter saws need a one-inch arbor. 

Purpose

Not all miter saw blades are made for the same purpose. So here’s some of our team’s insight to help you avoid using the wrong blade for certain tasks and materials. 

Ripping

If you’re engaged with a task that involves fast ripping, we suggest using blades with large gullets. Other than that, you can also use blades with hook angles around 20 degrees for fast cutting.

Melamine

When cutting melamine materials, it’s best to settle for blades with 80 teeth per inch. Blades with trapezoidal flat tooth profiles should also work well in this task. 

Plywood and Laminate

As plywood and laminate materials are often prone to chipping, we suggest buying blades with thin kerf and a higher tooth count.

Non-ferrous

Non-ferrous materials are known to make weak blades bind. So if you don’t want this to happen, equip your miter saw with blades that are higher toothed with a negative 5-degree hook angle.

FAQ

Is it safe to use a small miter saw blade?

You can use a small miter saw blade as long as it matches the specification requirements of your power tool. If it doesn’t, you’ll be risking your safety during usage. 

When is it time to change my miter saw blade?

If your blade has worn out and chipped carbide tips, it’s time to replace it. You can check it using a bright light or magnifying glass. 

Do I need to match the blade brand to my miter saw’s?

Not all miter saws are exclusively compatible with blades from the same brand. However, you must check if the blade you’ll be using matches your miter saw’s tooth type and gullet size requirement. 

When can I use a blade with lower teeth count?

Using a blade with a lower teeth count isn’t recommended if you want a smoother cut. 

Our Top Pick For a Miter Saw Blade for Trim:
Freud D12100X

After our hands-on experience with the best miter saw blades for trim, we chose the Freud D12100X as our top pick among other options. Besides its affordability, our tests proved that it grabs more firmly on the material. 

It’s also impressive that it features stabilizer vents that lessen the heat and prevent wobbling during the operation. 

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson

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