What is the Best Saw for Laminate Flooring? (2022)

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Laminate flooring installation or upgrades call for a laminate floor cutter. Should you use a sliding compound miter saw or just a regular cutter? The wrong choice could pose some problems down the line, which is exactly what our expert contractors want to help you avoid by picking out the best options for you to review.

Premium Pick
ROBERTS - 36434
Editor’s Choice
SKIL 3601-02
Budget Option
KORR KMAP001
ROBERTS - 36434
SKIL 3601-02
KORR KMAP001
• Cuts many types of flooring
• Guillotine style
• Solid surface
• Angle guide
• Die-cast aluminum fence
• Miter detents
• Lightweight and portable
• Crosscuts, miter cuts, & rip cuts
• Cuts many materials
• Compact
• Steel and aluminum construction
• Extended handle
Premium Pick
ROBERTS - 36434
ROBERTS - 36434
• Cuts many types of flooring
• Guillotine style
• Solid surface
• Angle guide
Editor’s Choice
SKIL 3601-02
SKIL 3601-02
• Die-cast aluminum fence
• Miter detents
• Lightweight and portable
• Crosscuts, miter cuts, & rip cuts
Budget Option
KORR KMAP001
KORR KMAP001
• Cuts many materials
• Compact
• Steel and aluminum construction
• Extended handle

Reviews of the Top Saws for Laminate Flooring

1. SKIL 3601-02

Our team’s first choice is a powered machine rather than just a stationary laminate floor cutter. The SKIL 3601-02 will cut laminate flooring with ease and can make a variety of cuts such as miters, crosscuts, and rip cuts. 

SKIL designed the 3601-02 to be a lightweight and portable design, so it’s the perfect choice for contractors like many members of our team.

There are miter detents at various degrees to make the cuts on laminate boards even more precise. The die-cast aluminum rip fence will guide your laminate flooring during straight cuts.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

2. ROBERTS - 36434

Although expensive, the Roberts 36343 is a guillotine-style cutter for laminate flooring and a variety of other materials such as engineered wood and even vinyl flooring. If you’re looking for a versatile device for cutting laminate flooring, the Roberts 36343 is an excellent option.

The extruded aluminum base gives you more room to work with and the extra long handle gives more leverage, which takes the pressure and stress off of you. You don’t need a miter saw for your laminate floors when you have the 36343 because it comes with a movable angle guide. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

3. KORR KMAP001

The KORR KMAP001 has a very large 9-inch cutting capacity, which makes it one of the best saws for laminate flooring for larger boards. Laminate flooring and fiber cement siding are no match for the guillotine-style laminate flooring saw. Although the saw blade has significant strength, the unit is surprisingly small, which fooled our team at first.

The saw is very compact, easy to use, and easy to carry with you from site to site. The sharp cutting blade won’t yield any splinters or rough edges, so you can rely on it for smooth and clean cuts.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

4. Norske Tools NMAP001

The Norske Tools NMAP001 also resembles our previous budget model, with a slightly higher price tag. Installing laminate flooring or even vinyl has never been easier. A circular saw can work on laminate flooring, but with the NMAP001, you get manual control over each cut.

It’s a compact and portable design made to prevent splinters and rough edges. The high-speed steel blade comes with the saw and it can make anywhere between 4000 to 5000 cuts before it will need to be sharpened or replaced. The unit doesn’t produce dust, is very quiet, and does not require electricity to operate. 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

5. DEWALT DWS779

Moving away from the manual laminate floor cutters brings us to a sliding compound miter saw. A miter saw is excellent for angled cuts, if that’s what you need. The stainless steel miter detent has a total of 10 stops, which is more versatile when you cut laminate flooring compared to a guillotine-type saw.

The bevel setting for the DeWalt DWS779 pivots up to 48 degrees to the left and right and it can even make crosscuts. The unit is strong, durable, and has various features like the tall sliding fences that support the material for accurate cuts.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

6. Bullet Tools - ES00-2009

The Bullet Tools ES00-2009 is a siding and laminate cutter that is capable of cuts up to 9 inches wide and 9/16 inches thick. Because this type of laminate flooring saw does not require any electricity, it won’t generate much dust or noise, unlike electric cutters.

Electric saws cause a lot of noise, but the quiet operation of this wood cutting tool allows users to work well into the night without disturbing any neighbors. One of the laminate board blades on this tool will outlast many saw blades. You get to work right when you get the package because there is no assembly required.

What We Like

What We Don't Like

7. MantisTol MC-330

For those with bamboo floors, fiber cement siding, LVT flooring or anything aside from laminate flooring can rejoice. The MantisTol MC-330 is all you need to cut those boards down to size. The unit itself is made from heavy-duty aluminum and steel, which are two lightweight yet durable materials.

The tool is quick, dust-free, and quiet, which makes it ideal for cuting laminate boards without exerting too much effort.

The MantisTol MC-330 is so durable that our experts even recommend it for businesses and some industrial jobs aside from regular household renovations. 

More products: 

Best saws for 2×4 cutting 

What We Like

What We Don't Like

Saws for Laminate Flooring Buyer’s Guide

Picking the best saw for laminate flooring requires more research than just getting a regular circular saw. Users need to consider the type of material it can get through as well as the construction. Our contractors have listed some important features laminate flooring saws must have.

Size and Portability

You can either choose to cut laminate by bringing the boards to your saw or vice versa. However, sometimes it’s just easier to lug the laminate floor cutter around, especially if you’re in a large house or job site – this is where the portability comes in.

Laminate cutters, the ones that do not need electricity to operate, are usually lighter and easier more mobile. There is no motor onboard and no range restrictions via the power cable. Our experts would definitely suggest a cutter you can lift and carry by hand, and the max weight of the device will vary from person to person.

If you can only manage to carry 10 pounds throughout a workday, then that’s your weight capacity. Luckily, most saws for laminate floors [1] that our experts listed are under that limit.  

Type of Saw

Aside from a manual cutter to cut laminate boards, homeowners, DIYers, and contractors can also use table saws, circular saws, jigsaws, regular manual flooring cutters, or even saws used for cutting rocks. With so many options available, which one should you choose?

Our experts will dive deeper into the discrepancies between manual and electric units, so we’ll focus on the type of saw here.

Table saws are great for laminate flooring if you have large boards and fast and accurate cuts. Both table saws and circular saws are excellent for straight cuts. If you’re only cutting laminate flooring down to size, then they are what our professionals recommend.

Just make sure that your table or circular saw blade can cut laminate flooring, solid wood, or any other flooring materials you may need to work with.

You then have miter saws, which can also make straight cuts but they are much better for angled cuts. You may not need to get a whole miter saw if your table and circular saws come with miter gauges. But just in case they don’t and you have miter saws in your arsenal, it’s useful to know that they make great flooring saws.

A chop saw is similar to a miter saw and it can also work to create cuts in one swift motion.

You then have the manual guillotine-style cutters, which work like paper cutters. It consists of a blade boring down into your material with each swift press of the lever. This type of flooring cutter is best to make a straight cut, but if you need a wider cutting range and higher cutting power, then our experts recommend the more versatile powered ones.

Additional Features

It’s always nice for a flooring saw to have extra features that can make the experience easier and more convenient for the user. Additional features on the best saw for laminate flooring such as a fence or cut guide and miter angle adjustments can create very precise results.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a flooring professional or just a beginner, these bonus capabilities will definitely make cutting laminate and other materials easier. Even upgrades from one model to the next count as additional features such as an improved wire guard or clearer angle gauge.

Blade Teeth and Strength

Your success when cutting laminate flooring is all about the blade. Diamond or carbide-tipped blades will last longer and stay sharper, but a carbide-tipped blade may be more expensive than regular saw blades.

The best saw blade to tackle laminate flooring is a circular one with carbide tips. You may not get strengthened options like ones with diamond tips if you’re looking for a jigsaw blade, but jigsaws are used for more complex cuts and don’t generally require as much strength as blades on other types of saws.

The TPI (tooth per inch) on a laminate floor cutter will also determine what it can chew through. Good saws will have 80 to 100 teeth if you’re looking at circular blades and a denser count for jigsaw blades. Look for carbide tips and a thin kerf for cleaner edges.

For cutting laminate flooring, you want a higher TPI, which means there is smaller spacing between each tooth. Blades like this will cut faster, smoother, and cleaner.

Other blade products: 

Manual or Electric Saw?

As our expert contractors have said, you can go for electric saws or manual saws. At a glance, you would think an electric saw is better because it has more precision and it takes less effort to operate, but do these facts remain true?

Let’s start with manual laminate floor cutters. A manual flooring cutter is the more common type we see. Of course, it is also cheaper, so it is recommended for those on a budget. A manual flooring cutter consists of a working surface and a long blade attached to a lever that you would need to press down on the material to make a cut – much like a paper cutter. 

You do have to have a certain level of strength to work a manual flooring cutter, but the perks can outweigh the cons for some. For example, a manual flooring cutter is super quiet and makes almost no sound because there is no electricity involved for operation. It is also cleaner as it doesn’t generate much dust, and we also mentioned the cheaper price.

The cons need to be considered if you’re looking to make angled cuts or intricate cuts. Guillotine-style laminate plank cutters can’t make these cuts. You may also experience some chipping when using this type of saw, so it will require your undivided attention.

An electric flooring cutter is much more advanced and versatile compared to the latter. Since they are electric, they can handle a heavier workload without tiring out your arm. They operate faster due to the same logic, but you are limited by the power cord and they are also heavier.

Electric flooring cutters also cost more, and they are the complete opposite of manual cutters in the sense that they are noisy and messy, which will restrict your working hours and locations. The most ideal saw for your needs will require you to weigh out the pros and cons of each type to decide. 

Price and Warranty

Flooring cutters aren’t too expensive, with the most expensive models (depending on what type of saw you choose) being around 500. As our experts have said, the type of flooring saw will impact the price. Manual ones are cheaper and electric ones are higher in cost. The features, the quality, and the brand could affect the price tag as well, so these are all things you should consider.

Always look at the warranty period before purchasing a product, especially one that’s subjected to so much labor like the flooring saws. Just in case anything goes wrong or the product arrives damaged upon arrival, you want the option to ask for reparations from the company. 

1-year warranties are pretty standard, so our contractors say to not settle for anything less and look for products that can offer longer ones.

How to Install Laminate Flooring

Laminate flooring is a durable flooring material that can look very modern. It’s a popular choice for many contractors, with the ones on our team included. For something that can look so lux, installing laminate flooring is actually easier than you think compared to solid wood flooring. In fact, it can be a great DIY project if you know how to do it.

The first step is to purchase the laminate planks a few days prior to installation. This is because the material is susceptible to temperature changes, meaning it can shrink or expand, so it requires some time to adjust to the environment in your home.

You should clean the sub-floor and make sure everything is level and even. The first step is to place the underlayment, which acts as a buffer between the ground and your laminate flooring to help even out the surface and protect the laminate plank from vapor and other natural elements.

When you’re finally ready to lay down the laminate, make sure you start from a corner and work your way out. You want to lay out the boards parallel to the largest wall of the room. While you’re laying the boards, remember to use wedge spacers to keep the boards in place while you continue with the laying.

Keep the boards as close to each other a possible. Not only will this help you limit spacing, but it also creates a more seamless and professional result. 

As you get to the last row, you will notice that more likely than not, your laminate flooring will not fit exactly into the space. This is when the the saw will come in as you cut it down to size. Once you’re done paving, remove the wedge spacers, make adjustments and apply final finishes if necessary, and you’re done!

FAQ

How can I cut laminate without chipping?

You can cut laminate without chipping if you use faster saws. On average, electric options will work better than manual saws because the blades spin at faster speeds. You can further reinforce this by picking a blade specifically designed to cut laminate floors.

Does laminate flooring dull saw blades?

Yes, laminate flooring will dull saw blades, but this is a universal truth for more power tools. Through time and wear and tear, your blades will dull, which is why replacement blades and sharpening tools are necessary. Purchasing the right type of blade could prolong the lifespan, but it will still happen eventually.

What type of saw is best for cutting laminate flooring?

The type of saw for that is best for cutting laminate flooring is a saw with a circular blade, such as a table saw, circular saw, or miter saw, but it all depends on the cut you want to make. However, manual cutters are excellent picks to reduce mess and noise, plus they are cheaper.

Our Top Pick For a Laminate Flooring Saw:
SKIL 3601-02

It’s no surprise that our team’s pick for the best saw for laminate flooring is a dedicated flooring saw from a reputable brand. The SKIL 3601-02 can handle laminate and engineered floors with miter detents so you can create angled cuts like a miter saw can. You can also make crosscuts and rip cuts with the help of a fence. The device is portable, solid, and reliable.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson

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