TedsWoodworking Plans and Projects

Millennials’ Pride of Doing Things On Their Own

Gone are the days when crafts and DIYs are viewed as old-age hobbies. The younger generation now has a thing for DIYs that they made it their own by adding in their tech-savviness and entrepreneurism. The crafting industry has been reported to be majorly composed of young adults, indicating how the millennials are fond of making things with their own hands.

kids crafting with mother

Millennial DIY Culture

The younger generation’s preference of actually doing things on their own can be traced back to the inner human nature to create something useful. Yet another factor could be the millennials’ nature of wanting to actively participate and get experiential value from something.

We thank the “Etsy culture” for heightening such nature of interest, especially as it encourages young people to discover and be proud of their creativity and personal artistry. Many websites like Etsy and Pinterest have come to promote the ability to create things by hand, which for a time has become a rare skill or talent. It is a breath of fresh air from the digital world we live in today, and although their resources and encouragement come from the current technology, younger people tend to set aside a time to learn how to do things on their own.

wood curving

DIY in the World of Technology

For millennials, the trend of DIY-ing stuff isn’t limited to doing new and extraordinary things. They can be as simple as mixing drinks on their own or baking pizza from scratch, and as complicated as making intricate detailing in sculptures or doing a whole room renovation project—every project, big or small, can be a source of pride for them.

A huge part of the DIY pride is the opportunity to share it with the world, which we know the younger generations love to do. With different social networking sites nowadays like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest, young adults can easily share and “brag” about anything that they do. And it doesn’t stop there—by doing so, they can encourage their peers to try doing things on their own as well. When people see their friends and colleagues try out something they never thought they could do, it gives them the idea that it is doable. Imagine this: a young lady who doesn’t even have a clue about power tools suddenly watching a video of her friend cutting a huge chunk of woods with a table saw. That’s a powerful encouragement for her to try it herself, right?

Another amazing advantage of having advanced technology is the easy transfer of knowledge and information. Aside from the ability to share to the world what they know and experience, the younger generations can easily find an excellent source of things they can make on their own. Pinterest pages and DIY blogs that provide step-by-step guides for unique woodworking projects for beginners like our article, making it possible for anyone who wishes to try out simple woodworking or any kind of DIY.

wooden piece with sawdust

DIY on a bigger scale

When talking about DIY and doing things on their own, we aren’t just pointing out the millennials’ aim to explore a hobby; it can be a deeper passion for the young ones that can turn into a full-time career or a starting point for their business ventures.  We’ve seen the rise of start-up companies in the last few years, and a part of that is the desire of young people to do things themselves—from developing concepts to creations of brands and the business aspect of starting a company—they are intrigued by the process itself. This is similar to the process that people who do woodworking as therapeutic art going through.

In the same way, we see younger people take on different manual labor jobs and woodworking projects not fully concerning themselves about the output and result of their hard work. For many of them, the creation process and the experience of using their hands to create something is a good enough reason to try out new things and be proud of what they choose to do.

Robert

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen and women. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert

Latest posts by Robert (see all)

We will be happy to see your thoughts

      Leave a reply

      Search