End Grain Cutting Board Calculator

end grain cutting board

If you buy something through our posts, we may get a small commission. Read more here.

If you do not know how to calculate the starting length of a board, it would be difficult to achieve your desired project size. To make  it easier, this end grain cutting board calculator will do the measurement work for you.

End Grain Cutting Board Calculator Formula

This calculator is put in place to make your measurements easy and hassle-free. But if you want to know the details on how the variables are computed, here is the formula:

end grain cutting board

FAQ

How much material do I need for an end grain cutting board?

To make an end grain cutting board you do not need many materials. The number of materials you will use depends solely on your desired size of the board. 

For a regular end grain cutting board, you will need ¾ dense hardwood with close grain. On the thickness side of things, your cutting board should not be more than 1-2 inches.

How thick should an end grain cutting board be?

The thickness of the end grain cutting board should be about two inches to two-and-a-half inches. This is the ideal thickness to prevent your board to warp or crack easily. Anything less than this depth will make the board prone to breakage and anything more will make it too heavy for you to use.

How do you plane an end grain cutting board?

Planing an end grain cutting board is inadvisable if you are inexperienced. To plane your end grain cutting board ensure that the planer blades are sharp, and use anti-tear-out pieces on both sides of the end grain cutting board. Lastly, use glue runners to prevent the board from braking.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen and women. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson