What is the Best Folding Saw? Reviews and Buying Guide (2024)

If you buy something through our posts, we may get a small commission. Read more here.

Anyone who spends significant time in the great outdoors will inevitably find themselves needing a versatile saw. But in a vast sea of options, finding a saw that remains sharp and resilient against the relentless outdoor elements can be a daunting task.

I understand this dilemma very well, so I’m here to share the best folding saws I’ve used over the years that are reliable and portable, standing up to the demands of the great outdoors.

Premium Option
Corona RazorTooth
Editor’s Choice
Bahco 396-LAP Laplander
Budget Option
EverSaw 8-inch Folding Saw
Corona RazorTooth
Bahco 396-LAP Laplander
EverSaw 8-inch Folding Saw
• Long blade
• Fast cutting
• Impulse hardened
• 6 teeth per inch
• Anti-rust
• XT toothing
• Leather strap
• 7 teeth per inch
• Carbon steel blade
• Three-sided teeth
• Lifetime warranty
• 9 teeth per inch
Premium Option
Corona RazorTooth
Corona RazorTooth
• Long blade
• Fast cutting
• Impulse hardened
• 6 teeth per inch
Editor’s Choice
Bahco 396-LAP Laplander
Bahco 396-LAP Laplander
• Anti-rust
• XT toothing
• Leather strap
• 7 teeth per inch
Budget Option
EverSaw 8-inch Folding Saw
EverSaw 8-inch Folding Saw
• Carbon steel blade
• Three-sided teeth
• Lifetime warranty
• 9 teeth per inch

Reviews of the Top Folding Saws

1. Bahco 396-LAP Laplander Folding Saw

The Bahco Laplander folding saw is an excellent tool for various tasks. The saw bites thanks to the XT toothing and the astonishing seven teeth per inch. You’ll save a ton of time and energy because these teeth were made to perform as effectively in both directions.

The handle is one of my favorite parts. It’s made from various polymers, so it’s easy to hold and feels good in your hand, and it comes with a leather band so you can carry the saw handy whenever you need it.

This Bahco 396-Lap does quick work cutting lumber, animal bones, and other materials thanks to a coating on the blade that prevents rust and minimizes friction.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

2. Corona Tools 10-Inch RazorTOOTH Folding Saw

A small, aggressive, and quick saw, the Corona 10-Inch Razor Tooth Saw is a must-have tool. Its locking mechanism is smartly located away from the user’s hand to reduce the likelihood of accidental activation.

What I like best about this saw is that the ergonomically co-molded grip has a wide triangular-shaped aperture for a lanyard and a soft rubber grip that virtually grips your hand. The Corona Razor Tooth is also versatile, suitable for tasks ranging from chopping firewood to trimming branches.

The blade’s curvature is designed for a pulling motion, which might be a bit too forceful for finer branches. Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by how quickly the Corona cuts and how sharp it is.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

3. EverSaw Folding Hand Saw Camp Saw 8" Foldable Saw

The EverSaw 8-inch folding hand saw is one of the most reliable and cost-effective folding saw options we’ve tried. It proved that you don’t have to choose between quality and cost, thanks to its high-carbon steel blade featuring three-sided teeth and a ribbed handle for a secure grip.

EverSaw benefits greatly from its focus on client satisfaction. We’ve found that they’re the greatest brand around when it comes to reacting quickly to customer complaints. 

Additionally, there is a lifetime guarantee on this particular saw. It is utilized by various credible organizations, including California State Parks, the US Forest Service, and more.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

4. Silky Professional BIGBOY 2000

While it’s common knowledge that longer saw blades are more prone to breaking than their shorter counterparts, this isn’t an issue with the Silky BIGBOY 2000 Folding Saw

Its blade spans an impressive 14.2 inches, but its resilience is commendable, thanks to the use of 1.4 mm thick ultra-durable high-carbon steel. Aside from the abundance of teeth, 5.5 of them per inch ensures long life and superior sawing performance; they have been taper ground and impulse hardened. 

I also appreciated the lanyard hole and the broad enough grip that makes the aluminum-coated rubber handle convenient to carry and use.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

5. Sven-Saw 60th Anniversary Engraved 21" Folding Saw

The Sven-Saw 60th anniversary saw has been manufactured in the United States for more than 60 years, and its Swedish steel blade is known for its exceptional sharpness.

After assembly, this saw was among the quickest triangular frame saws available; it took only 35 seconds to cut through a log with a diameter of 4-and-a-half inches. The 21-inch saw is 14 ounces in weight, making it quite portable. It is also available in a 15-inch version.

This 21-inch Sven folding bow can be a good alternative for a Bahco Laplander whenever you need to make larger cuts. It’s consistently held its own in various situations, and I’m particularly impressed by its design, which strikes a perfect balance between functionality and portability, ideal for long excursions into the wilderness.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

6. Silky Professional Series PocketBoy (346-17)

This Silky Pocketboy (346-17) weighs less than 6 ounces, making it much easier to transport than its larger counterpart. It may have a shorter blade at 6.8 inches, but its taper-ground and extra impulse-hardened teeth ensure it will overcome any obstacle you throw.

Despite its small stature, it performs admirably. The knife’s cutting stroke, characterized by a strong pull, makes for easy work. The blade is very excellent at keeping its edge but may still require sharpening or replacement over time.

You can choose from various blade lengths and tooth sizes for the PocketBoy. Within a certain length range, any blade can replace another.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

7. Opinel Folding Saw No. 12

The “12” in Opinel 12 refers to the saw blade’s length in centimeters. What stands out to me most about the Opinel No. 12 Folding Saws are their beechwood handles.

Nothing beats the feel of a wood handle once you’re working outside. In a way, it’s a classic. Because of it, the saw is easy and comfortable to use.

The blade itself is made of carbon steel, enhanced with an anti-corrosion coating, and includes a Virobloc safety ring. Weighing in at just 3.8 ounces, it’s a great buy for anyone longing for that classic touch in a folding saw.

What I Like

What I Don't Like

Folding Saws Buyer’s Guide

Overall Quality and Durability

The longevity of a folding saw is directly proportional to the overall quality.

When looking for a folding saw, it’s worth spending a little more on one with a high-quality blade. Invest in a sturdy saw that can last for years rather than one that will break after a few uses.

Consider a foldable saw with a removable blade, just in case the blade breaks or corrodes. A replacement blade is much less expensive than a whole new saw.

Many folding saws give you the ability to resharpen the blade is an additional consideration when picking out a folding saw.

Purpose of the Folding Saw

The blade of a folding saw could be extended to a length of five feet, making it suitable to cut wood and anything from 2-1/2-inch-thick. 

Saws are bulky and difficult to transport, but a folding saw is small, lightweight, and convenient. The lid opens and closes with the push of a single button.

Consider shelling out the extra $10–$20 for high-quality, dependable folding saws or hand saws, and make sure spare blades are easy to come by, both online and at local stores, if you plan on using them frequently.

Portability and Weight

If you’re sleeping in your car, portability and weight are not a problem. A more portable option is required if you take the folding saw through the woods.

You need big, heavy-duty saws to cut through thick branches before. However, high-quality compact saws that can cut through thick branches have become available in recent years.

Blades that provide cutting power with no excess weight tend to be more expensive.

Handle Construction and Comfort

Selecting a saw with an appropriate handle is the greatest way to combat discomfort. The ones I’ve handpicked above include high-quality grips, although some are more suited to particular tasks than others.

When choosing a handle, keep the following in mind:

Blade

Material

Ensure that the blade is made from a heavy-duty, long-lasting material capable of withstanding the stresses of its intended use for over a year.

Length

The ideal blade size for a folding saw, regardless of its intended use, is around the middle ground. One that’s overly huge will be awkward to transport. Buying a far too small runs the risk of being inadequate for the task.

Adjustability

The blades of the most adaptable folding saws can be changed by simply tightening or loosening a set of screws. Find adjustable blades so you can lengthen it, shorten, or replace it with a stronger alternative.

Sharpness

Aside from blade adjustability, blade replacement is also important. Rather than sharpening, replacement may be recommended by the manufacturer of your saw because, even after sharpening, the blade will never be as sharp as when they first made it.

Teeth Per Inch

Saw blades with plenty of teeth per inch can produce finer finished cuts, but they also cut more slowly through wood. If you reduce the number of teethers per inch, the final cut will be coarser, but you’ll complete the task in less time.

Safety Features

Always use caution with blades and other pointed objects. The blade of any folding knife needs to be secured in the handle while it is folded and must also be locked open.

Replacement Blades

Check the price of new blades for your folding saw before you buy. It’s easy to get fooled by a saw’s low purchase price before you realize you’ll need to replace the blade frequently.

You could teach yourself to sharpen the saw’s blade, but doing so can be tricky. The same can also be said when straightening out a crooked saw blade.

Therefore, if you are not an expert sharpener, you should plan to purchase new blades regularly.

Cutting Performance

Saws designed specifically for camping are the best folding saws for making shortcuts. Look for blades that can withstand more pressure to cut through the ice and can be utilized for cutting firewood and larger-diameter logs.

Push or Pull Stroke

You may skip the deep contemplation for this one. For the most part, folding saws are pull-type.  The saw blade can be made more compact and thinner. You can have more control and make cleaner cuts using a pull-stroke cut.

Always pull gently to create a saw cut; you don’t need to apply excessive force. It’s time to put your teeth to work. Refrain from trying to force it, otherwise, you’ll damage the wood or distort the saw blade.

Pull Stroke

Push Stroke

  • High-pressure otential pressure
  • Most effective when slicing through tough substances
  • Sharp edges point away from the grip
  • Thin blades
  • The ability to make finer, more exact cuts
  • Teeth slanted toward the grip

Locking Mechanism

It’s helpful if your folding saw has a locking mechanism, whether it’s a single lock, which engages only when the blade is unfolded, or a double lock that locks when both folded and unfolded.

There may be a button to press on some folding saws or a latch to release, like the Opinel No. 18. It’s convenient that the saw blade doesn’t dangle dangerously, whether it’s open or closed.

What is the Ideal Blade and Teeth for Greenwood and Dry Wood?

The number of teeth per inch is also significant since a saw blade intended for woodworking with fine teeth and many teeth per inch will be a pain to operate when chopping heavy greenwood in the great outdoors.

These saws will do a good job but tend to get congested with fibers when cutting green wood. When teeth pass through dry wood, pieces of the wood tend to flake and crumble.

Many packages will clearly label greenwood saw blades as having fewer teeth per inch or a “wider rake” than standard.

If you’re unsure, go with something with a medium teeth blade; the great outdoors has both green and dry wood in abundance. Think of it as the Goldilocks principle [1]: you want just the right amount of teeth per inch, but not too many or too few. 

The Bahco Laplander has proven to be highly dependable when I’m working with soft and hardwood.

What’s the Difference Between a Folding Saw and a Bow Saw?

A folding saw is a portable and space-saving alternative to a traditional saw. It requires little more than one hand to open and close. 

While its primary purpose is for cutting wood up to 2-1/2 inches in thickness, you can also use a folding saw for other materials like drywall or plastic pipe.

In contrast to a folding saw, a bow saw has a longer blade and is, therefore, better suited for cutting through thicker lumber. By drawing the blade of the bow saw into the wood at an angle, the operator may make cleaner cuts.

Why You Should Use a Folding Saw?

Saws that fold up are extremely versatile and can be used for various tasks, including limbing trees, felling small trees, removing undergrowth, and carving wood for bushcraft. 

They are an excellent handy tool and alternative for any farmer or gardener due to their adaptability. 

How to Sharpen a Folding Saw

Saw blade teeth, like chainsaw chains, can be sharpened if you put in the time and effort. If you want to learn how to sharpen saw teeth, you should obtain a Japanese saw tooth sharpener, which is diamond-coated and perfect for hardened steel, or a chainsaw sharpening kit. 

It’s not difficult once you get the feel of it, and the long-term financial benefits might be substantial.

FAQ

Can a folding saw cut a tree down?

Small trees can be easily felled using a folding saw. The notch cut can be made with an axe, while you can make the felling cut with a saw. Alternatively, you can use a pruning saw on trees 6 inches in diameter or less.

My Top Pick For a Folding Saw:
Bahco 396-LAP Laplander Folding Saw

When it comes to the best folding saw, the Bahco 396-LAP takes the crown. This gem has quickly become my favorite sidekick, thanks to its reliability and ease of use.

The teeth glide more smoothly, and the blade lasts longer with a rust-inhibitor coating. The handle is another strong point because of how comfortable it is to use. It is a good choice as a camping saw or a survival tool for hunters and anyone who loves the outdoors.

robert headshot

Robert Johnson is a passionate furniture maker & carpenter, sought after for his knowledge on the craft.
You’ve probably seen his down-to-earth wisdom in USA Today, Bobvila, Family Handyman, and The Spruce, where he has shared commentary and guidance on various woodworking topics.

Robert is the brain behind Sawinery, where he aims to share tips, tricks, and a passion for all things carpentry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Articles
Join our community on facebook and get 3 woodworking plans for free!