Chainsaw Chain Identification Chart

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Regular chainsaw usage means you’ll eventually need to replace its metal links for better cutting operations. However, if you’re not well-versed in component replacement, there’s a chance you’ll get confused about the right chain measurements.

If you don’t want to install the wrong chain option, read this chainsaw chain identification chart plus other useful tips from our tool experts. 

Chain Identification Guide

As you know, not all chainsaw chains offer the same features and durability. But no matter what chainsaw brand you’re currently using, it’s crucial to know your chain’s key measurements, like the pitch, drive links, and gauge. 

You can easily find these measurements in the chain identification guide. Thanks to this chart, even newbie users can identify the right chain for their saw by just looking at the measurement markings. 

Chain Number

If you inspect your chainsaw closer as our team did, you’ll notice a stamped number in the tool’s drive tooth. 

chain number

These are codes used by manufacturers to identify if a specific chain is compatible with the chainsaw or not. It also signifies the exact dimensions of the chain’s pitch and gauge. 

chainsaw chain chart

Number of Links

After identifying the chain’s number, one of the first things you need to do is count the tool’s drive links. 

number of links

If you’re unfamiliar with what it is, you just have to look for tiny teeth underneath the chain construction. You may not know, but you can easily identify the saw chain size through the number of drive links. 

Chain Gauge

If your chainsaw is worn-out and the identification number is all faded, we suggest getting the chain’s gauge measurement. This feature indicates the thickness of the drive links and must always match with the guide bar’s gauge. 

chain gauge

You’ll find different gauge sizes in the market, like .043-inch, .050-inch, .058-inch, and .063-inch. Remember, selecting the wrong size for your chainsaw could lead to less traction during the cutting operations.

Chain Pitch

When calculating the chain’s pitch, you’ll need to get the overall distance between 3 rivets and divide them into two. 

chain pitch

This computation will lead you to the chain’s total size. We recommend using a tape measure or ruler for easy measurement [1].

Gauge and Pitch to Chain Number

After getting the three crucial measurements, proceed to the below chart to identify which chain type suits your chainsaw.

PitchGaugeOregon Chain
¼”0.050″ (1.3mm)25
3250.050″ (1.3mm)20
3250.050″ (1.3mm)95
3250.058″ (1.5mm)21
3250.063″ (1.6mm)22
⅜”0.050″ (1.3mm)72
⅜”0.058″ (1.5mm)73
⅜”0.063″ (1.6mm)75
⅜”0.043″ (1.1mm)90
⅜”0.050″ (1.3mm)91
4040.063″ (1.6mm)59

FAQ

What do the letters mean on a chainsaw chain?

The letters on a chainsaw are identification markings that allow manufacturers to identify the chain’s measurements. These codes indicate the pitch and gauge metrics suitable for a specific saw chain. 

What does 91 mean on a chainsaw chain?

The code 91 on a chainsaw chain means that it has a low-profile pitch, measuring ⅜-inch. It also indicates that the saw chain has a .050-inch gauge measurement. 

What is the difference between .325 and 3/8 chains?

The difference between .325 and 3/8 chains is their sizes. The 0.325 chain is smaller, so it moves faster than its alternative. Meanwhile, the ⅜-inch chains are known to be more durable and long-lasting. The .325 chain file size is also different from the 3/8 chain file size

Conclusion

Getting yourself familiar with the chainsaw chain identification chart is a great way to be well-versed in your chainsaw’s repairs and parts. 

If you ask our power tool specialists, doing chain replacement by yourself will save more time and money. Moreso, it will also avoid engine and cutting issues in the long run.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson

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