Hole Saw Size Chart | Wood, Metal, Plastic, & More

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Hole saws come in different types and sizes, and it can be very difficult and confusing to determine what type is needed for your project. To avoid damaging materials and spending money you don’t have, you must have a hole saw size chart in hand. 

In this article, we will share what you need to know before dealing with hole saws.

What are Hole Saws and How are They Used?

Hole saws can cut through drywall, steel, aluminum, wood, and more. They are used to pierce circular holes for projects requiring precise and clean cuts.

You can use a standard drill with spade bits for larger holes with 1″ in diameter. But for bigger holes, you will need to utilize hole saws. 

operating a hole saw

Most hole saws have a collar, driving pins, a pilot bit, and a shaft on an arbor or mandrel. First, you attach the hole saw to the arbor with driving pins. Then, insert the arbor shaft into a drill to use the hole saw. The arbor’s pilot bit removes a pilot hole in the piece. 

Different Hole Saws Available Today

The fundamental difference between hole saws is their material. They are classified according to their tips/blades. Hole saws include:

Bimetal

A bimetal hole saw is, as the name implies, composed of two metals. The frames are often carbon steel, whereas the teeth are high-speed steel.

hole saw

They are commonly used to drill holes in various materials, including metals, plastics, and wood.

Tungsten Carbide

Although they don’t quite live up to the durability of their bimetal counterparts, these hole saws nonetheless serve a useful role around the house or in a small workshop. As a result of the material’s properties, carbon steel hole saws can only be used for very lightweight tasks.

Carbon steel hole saws can be used in various materials, including drywall, plywood, plastic, etc.

Carbon Steel

To increase durability, the teeth of these hole saws are typically coated with carbide. The result is exceptionally long durability and quick cutting action.

hole saw blades

Carbide hole saws with normal teeth can be used on non-ferrous metals [1], hardwood, plastic, etc. But the one with the gulleted square teeth is even more durable and may be used on bricks, concrete, marble, etc.

Our Top Recommendation:
Comfecto Bi-Metal Hole Saw Kit

If you prefer drilling clean and accurate holes, the best you can do is buy drill bits made with durable bi-metal steel like the ones from Comfecto. These pieces have high-quality teeth that can hole through any metal or wood.

They have fine-toothing designs that can operate smoothly, so you don’t have to worry about them getting stuck on the material. This kit will also give you access to suitable bits for different projects. 

Size Charts for Hole Saws

Even hole saws come in a wide range of sizes, much like most other common power equipment. The smallest diameter of the materials our pro woodworkers used is 5/8 inches, and the largest is 6 inches. 

Remember that size charts provided by manufacturers are your best bet for obtaining precise measurements, especially when you want to know the accurate hole saw size for your door knob. Down to the part number, they provide you with all you need to know.

Hole Saw Sizes for Bi-Metal Material

Diameter

Max. Cutting Depth

Pipe Tap Size

Pipe

Entrance

Size

RPM

inch

mm

inch

inch

inch

Steel

Iron

Non-ferrous

Plastic

5/8

16

1-5/16

550

365

730

880

3/4

19

1-7/16

1/2

3/8

460

300

600

740

7/8

22

1-7/16

3/4

1/2

390

260

520

640

1

25

1-7/16

350

235

470

560

1-1/8

29

1-7/16

1

3/4

300

200

400

480

1-1/4

32

1-7/16

275

180

360

440

1-3/8

35

1-7/16

1

250

165

330

400

1-1/2

38

1-7/16

1-1/4

230

150

300

370

1-5/8

41

1-7/16

210

140

280

340

1-3/4

44

1-1/4

1-1/2

1-1/4

195

130

260

320

1-7/8

48

1-1/4

180

120

240

290

2

51

1-1/4

1-1/2

170

115

230

270

2-1/8

54

1-1/4

160

105

210

260

2-1/4

57

1-1/4

2

150

100

200

250

2-3/8

60

1-1/4

140

95

190

230

2-1/2

64

1-1/4

2

135

90

180

220

2-5/8

67

1-1/4

2-1/2

130

85

170

210

2-3/4

70

1-1/4

125

80

160

200

2-7/8

73

1-1/4

120

80

150

180

3

76

1-1/4

2-1/2

115

75

140

180

3-1/4

83

1-1/4

3

105

70

140

170

3-1/2

89

1-1/4

95

65

130

160

3-3/4

95

1-1/4

3-1/2

90

60

120

150

4

102

1-1/4

85

55

110

140

4-1/2

114

1-1/4

4

75

50

100

120

5

127

1-1/4

65

45

80

110

5-1/2

140

1-1/4

—-

60

40

75

100

6

152

1-1/4

55

35

70

90

Hole Saw Sizes for Carbide Tipped Material

Diameter

Pipe Tap Size

Pipe Entrance Size

inch

mm

inch

inch

3/4

19

3/8

7/8

22

3/4

1/2

1

25

1-1/8

29

1

3/4

1-1/4

32

1-3/8

35

1

1-1/2

38

1-1/4

1-5/8

41

1-3/4

44

1-1/2

1-1/4

1-7/8

48

2

51

1-1/2

2-1/8

54

2-1/4

57

2

2-3/8

60

2-1/2

64

2

2-5/8

67

2-1/2

2-3/4

70

2-7/8

73

3

76

2-1/2

3-1/4

83

3

3-1/2

89

3-3/4

95

3-1/2

4

102

4-1/4

108

4

4-1/2

114

4

4-3/4

121

4-1/2

5

127

5-1/2

140

6

152

FAQ

What size of hole saws do electricians use?

Electricians use 2- to 7-inch hole saws. Larger sizes are utilized for recessed can lights and 2-inch saws for feeders. You need a kit between 50 and 90mm for recessed lighting to drill joint feed holes.

Do all hole saws use the same arbor?

No, not all hole saws use the same arbor. An arbor might only work with a specific brand of hole saw, especially if it has an incorporated shank. Premium hole saw brands typically come equipped with universal arbors that can be used with drill bits from any manufacturer.

Conclusion

The hole saw is a unique device. In materials as varied as metal, gypsum, plastic, wood, and more, they make quick work of drilling holes as large as 6 inches in diameter. 

However, precision is key to successfully using the tool. Thus, users must reference a hole saw size chart before starting any project involving a hole saw.

Robert Johnson is a woodworker who takes joy in sharing his passion for creating to the rest of the world. His brainchild, Sawinery, allowed him to do so as well as connect with other craftsmen. He has since built an enviable workshop for himself and an equally impressive online accomplishment: an extensive resource site serving old timers and novices alike.
Robert Johnson
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