What is the Best Saw for Cutting Rocks? (2024)

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The most recommended saws for cutting rocks are band saws and circular saws. However, it’s important to note that it’s not just the saw, but the type of blade you choose. I’ve personally spent a significant amount of time identifying the best options, ensuring you get value for your money and spare you the hassle of returns.

Premium Pick
Inland Craft DB-100
Editor’s Choice
DEWALT DCS570B
Budget Option
POWERTEC BS900
Inland Craft DB-100
DEWALT DCS570B
POWERTEC BS900
• Comes with diamond blades
• Excellent for intricate cuts
• Coolant system
• Variable speed motor
• Brushless motor
• Easy to use
• 5200 RPM
• Can make bevel cuts
• More affordable price
• Best for precision cuts
• Blade guard adjustment
• Rack and Pinion adjustments
Premium Pick
Inland Craft DB-100
Inland Craft DB-100
• Comes with diamond blades
• Excellent for intricate cuts
• Coolant system
• Variable speed motor
Editor’s Choice
DEWALT DCS570B
DEWALT DCS570B
• Brushless motor
• Easy to use
• 5200 RPM
• Can make bevel cuts
Budget Option
POWERTEC BS900
POWERTEC BS900
• More affordable price
• Best for precision cuts
• Blade guard adjustment
• Rack and Pinion adjustments

1. DeWalt DCS570B

Regardless of what type of saw you choose, you have to use a diamond blade for stone. Not every saw comes with a diamond blade, so you have to make sure you have some in your arsenal. The DeWalt DCS670B has a brushless motor that provides up to 5200 RPM. 

Once it’s paired with a diamond blade, the stone material in question will be no match. The blade will also maintain speed under load and the power tool works with batteries within the 20V line. 

The corded electric circular saw can cut more bevel angles than most for versatility.

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

2. Inland Craft DB-100

The next type of saw that works well with stone is a band saw. The Inland Craft DB-100 comes with a diamond blade ready to cut into stone, tile, ceramic, and more. Compared to a circular saw, I highly recommend the band saw for those intricate and detailed cuts.

The DC motor on this model offers variable speeds, allowing the saw blade to reach up to 3400 RPM. What I find impressive about the DB-100 is its coolant system. It consistently delivers water to the blade, ensuring it stays lubricated and cool.

This saw is not only compact but also comes with a 1-year warranty, which speaks to its quality. 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

3. POWERTEC BS900

Band saws don’t have to come at a premium price, and the POWERTEC BS900 is the perfect example of that. This band saw doesn’t come with a diamond blade, so make sure to purchase your own, especially when you intend to use it for hard materials like cutting tough metals in locks.

Easy and quick blade changes are possible with the blade guard that allows for easy access and there is a blade tracking window and a dust port to keep your work surface free of debris. The aluminum die cast table tilts for angled cuts and the rack and pinion fence is adjustable up to 45 degrees. 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

4. Makita XSH08Z

As an expert contractor, I’d like to highlight another circular saw model to consider. This robust saw can achieve up to 6000 RPM, which is quite impressive in terms of speed. I’m particularly fond of its BL brushless motor—it tends to run cooler and outlast many others on the market.

If you’re looking for great value for your money, The Makita XSH08Z is an excellent cordless choice. It gives you a wider range of motion as you are not limited by the length of the cord, but the blades will need to be replaced to go head to head with stone, cement, and concrete [1]

Other products to try: 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

Saws for Cutting Rocks Buyer’s Guide

Motor Power

To effectively cut through tough materials like rocks, choosing a saw with a powerful motor and a high RPM (rotations per minute) is crucial. These features will provide the necessary cutting force and speed to efficiently tackle the hardness of the rocks.

Circular saws can run at 4000 to 6000 RPM and over for rocks and band saws are a little weaker as they are meant for intricate details, but they still provide over 3000 RPM.

Cutting Strength and Efficiency

It’s not just the type of saw that determines its effectiveness in cutting rocks—it’s predominantly about the blade. Whether you go for a band saw, a circular saw, or even a tile saw, the key is pairing it with a robust diamond blade to ensure strength and efficiency. 

Related pages: 

My Top Pick For a Saw For Cutting Rocks:
DeWalt DCS570B

The DeWalt DCS570B outshone all the other best saws for cutting rocks to take the top spot. A circular saw is one of the most versatile tools a contractor or woodworker can have in the shop. This unit has a brushless motor that spins blades up to 5500 RPM and offers bevels up to 57 degrees for increased versatility.

More products: 

High-quality stump grinder

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Robert Johnson is a passionate furniture maker & carpenter, sought after for his knowledge on the craft.
You’ve probably seen his down-to-earth wisdom in USA Today, Bobvila, Family Handyman, and The Spruce, where he has shared commentary and guidance on various woodworking topics.

Robert is the brain behind Sawinery, where he aims to share tips, tricks, and a passion for all things carpentry.

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