What is the Best Scroll Saw Blade? (2024) — Top Picks For Hard and Soft Wood

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When I’m looking to create intricate curves and designs in the woodworking world, I always turn to my trusty scroll saw. Believe me, the last thing you want is for the wrong blade to ruin months of meticulous work. That’s why I’ve personally spent time, alongside other seasoned woodworking engineers, to identify the best scroll saw blades on the market. It’s all about having the right tools for the job.

Premium Pick
Flying Dutchman Ultra Reverse
Editor’s Choice
Olson Saw SP46500
Budget Option
BOSCH SS5-15PL
Flying Dutchman Ultra Reverse
• Pinless blades
• Top-quality hardened steel
• 3rd tooth reversed
• Prevents splintering
• Spiral design
• 360-degree cutting capacity
• High carbon steel saw blade
• Hardened 36 TPI
• Affordable price
• Precision sharpened
• 5-blade package
• Plain end scroll saw blades
Premium Pick
Flying Dutchman Ultra Reverse
Flying Dutchman Ultra Reverse
• Pinless blades
• Top-quality hardened steel
• 3rd tooth reversed
• Prevents splintering
Editor’s Choice
Olson Saw SP46500
• Spiral design
• 360-degree cutting capacity
• High carbon steel saw blade
• Hardened 36 TPI
Budget Option
BOSCH SS5-15PL
• Affordable price
• Precision sharpened
• 5-blade package
• Plain end scroll saw blades

Reviews of the Top Scroll Saw Blades

1. Olson Saw SP46500

Scroll saw blades come in a wide variety, and I can vouch for spiral blades for their highly detailed cuts from every direction. More specifically, the Olson SP46500 spiral scroll saw blades are great for 0 radius scroll and fret work. Spiral scroll saw blades handle all the turning for you, so you never have to adjust your workpiece.

The hardened and tempered carbon steel spiral tooth scroll blades have a 36 TPI (teeth per inch) with a 0.41-inch kerf that are designed to stay sharper for longer. The durability will guarantee it lasts longer than other packs that have more than one blade.

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

2. Flying Dutchman Ultra Reverse Scroll Saw Blade

The Flying Dutchman Ultra Reverse scroll saw blades may seem very pricey, but there is a reason behind the high cost. In fact, it is what I prefer to use for high cutting speeds. This is because these pinless blades have every third tooth reversed, which prevents splintering and supports smooth cuts.

If you’re looking for aggressively fast cuts, you won’t get much better blades for the job than a pinless reverse skip tooth blade. These milled blades give a sharper edge, and these Flying Dutchman blades in particular are crafted in Germany with top-quality hardened steel. 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

3. BOSCH SS5-15PL

As always, I follow the priciest option with one in a more affordable price range. The BOSCH SS5-15PL scroll saw blades come in a pack of 4, and measure at 5 inches each. They are plain end blades for scroll saws and are highly recommended for plastic.

Of course, to enhance precision, these blades have been sharpened to make the most detailed cuts. There is a variety of TPIs, but these ones come with 15, which can handle most standard jobs on wood, plastic, and some metals.

They are of great value, pinless, and easy to use.

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

4. Olson Saw FR49400

Olson scroll saw blades are my favorite, which is why it makes many appearances on the list. The Olson FR49400 skip tooth blades come in a pack of 36, which gives you more value for your money.

If you’re looking for a very versatile blade pack, look no further. The FR49400 can handle wood, bronze, copper, rubber, and plastic to name a few materials. Made with carbon steel, the skip tooth blades can support fast cuts and smooth finishes for the most intricate and refined cuts. 

You also get a wide variety of TPIs ranging from 11.5, 12.5, and 20 for more variety.

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

5. Olson Saw FR42003

Another type of blade for the scroll saw I have on the list is the Olson Saw FR42003 pack, which consists of reverse tooth pin end saw blades. Pin end saw blades are generally easier to change, which is why I prefer them.

You get a pack of 6 blades with widely-spaced teeth, which are ideal for fast cutting. These saw blades are my go-to for high speeds. You will notice absolutely no splints, just clean cuts on both sides of the material.

These pin end scroll blades are suitable for handheld saws and machine saws on a variety of materials. 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

6. Olson Saw FR43001

Are you looking for smaller pin end saw blades? Then the Olson Saw FR43001 is my choice. These skip tooth pin end blades are only 3 inches long, so make sure they give enough clearance for the job at hand.

Being well-versed in blades, I can tell you that these are smaller than most. I’d personally recommend them for thin sheets of material, a stark contrast to the option I mentioned earlier. With 15 TPI, these pins truly shine when it comes to cutting intricate shapes on hobby scroll saws.

Plastic, wood, and non-ferrous metals [1] are no match for the FR43001, but keep in mind they give a medium smooth finish.

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

7. OLSON SAW PG49802

The Olson PG49802 blade type is the best for fast cuts, thanks to the incredibly sharp teeth. It’s the brand’s pride and joy for it is the most accurate blade made for exceptionally precise cuts. Whether it’s tight corners or curves, the PG49802 can handle it with grace.

They are double tooth blades that have two teeth together followed by a flat space. This design helps with chip removal for smooth edges.

Made from high-quality carbon steel, the 18 blade variety pack has nothing but premium blades and you can upgrade your already accurate scroll saw to a higher level of precision. 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

8.Olson Saw CT62900

The CT62900 crown tooth blade Olson makes is my choice for cutting wood and plastics up to ¾ of an inch thick. There are only 6 teeth per inch, as crown tooth blades are best for fretwork, and slow up and down motions. The Olson CT62900 saw blades offer smooth and clean finishes that are splinter-free.

The plain ends are easy to install with your scroll saw and you can just turn over the saw blades for a new set of sharp teeth ready to tackle the task. The thicker blades will stay very sharp for a lot longer. 

What I Like

What I Don’t Like

Scroll Saw Blades Buyer’s Guide

Size and Thickness

Scroll saw blades don’t usually exceed 5 inches, so the size isn’t difficult to find, but there are shorter ones that are around 3 inches, and I made sure to include that just in case you have an older saw model. 

However, the thickness of the blade is something that is very important. The thickness will determine how long-lasting the blade is, and how strong and tough it is. In general, a thicker blade will have a longer lifespan, but they aren’t recommended by me for intricate and detailed cuts.

When I tackle highly complex work, I lean towards using a thinner blade. As you might expect, these blades are somewhat more delicate than their thicker counterparts, but the difference isn’t vast. While they’re exceptional for finer cuts, they don’t have the same longevity. That’s why I usually find them in assortment packs.

Teeth

Next, you have the teeth count and type to consider. The teeth on the best scroll saw blade will determine what material you can cut through and the speeds at which you can do it while still maintaining the best results.

The teeth are depicted as the TPI of a blade, or teeth per inch. It basically pertains to the density of the teeth, which affects how widely they are spaced. The more teeth per inch a blade has, the better it is for slower speeds while still delivering a smooth finish. Blades with fewer teeth per inch are better for fast cuts that don’t sacrifice precision or finish.

Why does a higher teeth count cut faster? It’s because there is less space for a higher number, so you will find small teeth on a higher TPI. The small size means less wood is removed, but you get a smoother result. Since these blades are thinner, the smaller teeth blades tend to snap more easily. 

Since we’re talking about blades for scroll saws, it is difficult to find models that have more than 10 teeth per inch. 

Material Quality

The durability of the scroll saw blades depend heavily on the material. You will most likely find saw blades made from premium-grade steel. It’s important to find top-grade hardened steel if possible, as it increases the robustness of the saw blades.

I wouldn’t put the blade’s material as the top deciding factor. Sure, the material influences the blade’s thickness, which in turn affects the cut and speed. But I firmly believe that the type of blade, its thickness, and the teeth count should be your primary considerations before the material.

Blade Type

You might have noticed the variety of blade types I’ve mentioned in my list. Whether you’re just starting with scroll saws or you’re a seasoned user like me needing a quick refresher, remember this: the blade type is crucial in deciding which materials you can work with.

Let’s start with the most basic blade – the standard scroll saw blade. They are very common, perhaps the most common, and they also have the simplest design. Each tooth on a standard scroll saw blade is evenly spaced and all the same size. You can find both low and high TPIs with standard blades, and they are designed to balance the cutting speed with a smooth finish.

The skip tooth blade has a name that alludes to its design. They are similar to standard blades in the sense that they also have uniform teeth, but with every other tooth missing. The open space between blades is referred to as the gullet. Therefore, skip tooth blades have half the number of teeth the standard blades feature. Skip tooth blades are meant for faster cuts.

They are not the easiest to handle, which is why I do not suggest this type of blade for beginners. What they can do is create very very smooth cuts that don’t need much touching up after aside from a simple rub with sandpaper.

The reverse skip tooth blades, like the Flying Dutchman option on my list,  have a skip tooth pattern on one half, and a reverse version of the top half on the bottom. The interesting design reduces splinters, cracking, and splitting on your material, and you will see fine and smooth results on both sides. However, these blades wear out faster, and you will see a more obvious pileup of sawdust.

Then there are the precision ground blades, which I’ve also highlighted on my list. Typically, PGT blades are of the skip tooth variety, with each tooth meticulously ground for sharpness and precision. Given their thin nature and sharper cutting edge, I’d personally recommend them when you’re aiming for the finest details.

Spiral blades, which is my number one scroll saw blade choice, can cut in every direction and eliminates the need for you to manually rotate your workpiece. The cut is a little rougher, so be prepared to smooth down the edges by hand after.

Lastly, I’ve highlighted the crown tooth blade on my list. It’s a relatively new entrant in the world of scroll saw blades, designed primarily for control. I’ve found it particularly adept at cutting materials like plexiglass, plastic, and certain woods.

What type should you pick? I say scroll saw users will benefit most from more than one time. If you can, purchase all of the above types to curate an excellent blade collection. This way, you will always have a blade for the project you’re working on. 

Attachment Options

How do you know if blades for scroll saws are easy to change and attach? There are two types – the pin end scroll saw blade and pinless blades. 

In general, pinned blades are larger in size, and I recommend them for straighter cuts. Older scroll saws usually have pinned blades, so make sure this type will work with your device. For ease of installation, pinned blades are better because you simply slip the pins into the holes. 

On the contrary, pinless scroll saw blades are smaller in size and also lighter weight. Instead of straight lines, the pinless design is better for small and precise cuts. They are not as easy to install as the pin end scroll saw blade, which means you will need to take some time to switch them out. 

Again, I suggest purchasing both (if your saw is compatible), just so you have more options when you work on different projects. 

Purpose/Complexity of Patterns

What do you need the scroll saw blade for? Consider the complexity of the pattern you want to cut using the scroll saw, the material you’re cutting and the overall purpose to decide which type of scroll saw blade is the best for you. 

For intricate designs, most scroll saws will need blades with smaller teeth. For basic and straight cuts, look for a scroll saw blade with larger and more spaced out teeth. Again, I recommend a blade set so you can have replacement blades for every task.

Advantages of Scroll Saw Blades

Are scroll saw blades worth all the hype? Yes, they are, if your job or hobby mainly consists of making intricate cuts. A scroll saw blade set will undoubtedly give you accuracy and precision over all the finer details. Whether it is with smaller pieces or more delicate designs, a scroll saw blade set will meet your needs.

In fact, the scroll saw blade is designed specifically for the more complex designs, as long as you fit them with compatible scroll saws. Whether it’s softwood or hardwood, you can find a dozen scroll saw designs that can handle the material you are working on.

Any type of blade dulls with heavy use, but scroll saw blades often come in packs and many are made with thicker materials that will guarantee a longer lifespan. A scroll saw blade also gives a better finish, which delivers a more refined cut in one go, and minimizes the amount of sanding and polishing a woodworker needs to do.

Since you’re working on such fine cuts with a scroll saw blade, it also happens to enhance your skills as a carpenter. You will become more precise and skilled at the specialized cuts.

Why Change the Blades of Your Scroll Saw?

In my years of carpentry, I’ve learned the importance of keeping an assortment of blades on hand, especially when it’s time to replace the factory blade on a scroll saw. Just like any blade, scroll saw blades do wear out and lose their sharpness over time.

It’s not only unideal, but a dull blade can impact the precision you can carry out and even compromise your safety. Dull blades can stick, snap, and take much more force to cut through materials, which will increase the chances of woodworkers accidentally hurting themselves.

Dull blades also create more friction, which could mean higher chances of burning and sparks. 

How to Properly Change Scroll Saw Blades

Now that you know the importance of changing scroll saw blades, it’s also crucial to understand how to do it properly so you don’t hurt yourself.

The first step is to unplug the scroll saw and make sure the blade is fully halted. Once the blade is stationary, you can then proceed to release the blade tension and loosen or remove the blade mounts. Take out the old blade, place the new blade into the correct position, and tighten the blade mounts around the blade. 

Adjust the blade tension before plugging the scroll saw back in and test it out on a piece of scrap wood to make sure everything is working as it should.

(For tool blade services, you can also depend on these top-tier saw blade sharpening services available in the US)  

FAQ

How do I choose a scroll saw blade?

You can choose a scroll saw blade by assessing the type of material you work with and how complex and intricate the cuts are. The answer to these questions will determine the TPI (teeth per inch), the type of blade, and the size and thickness you choose. 

What are spiral scroll saw blades used for?

The spiral scroll saw is used for all types of materials and cuts in any direction. It gives woodworkers and carpenters more convenience since there is no need to rotate the workpiece to make certain cuts. They are usually quite thick as well, which contributes to a longer lifespan.

My Top Pick For a Scroll Saw Blade:
Olson Saw SP46500

My top pick for the best scroll saw blade is Olson SP46500 Spiral Blade. I stress again that the right one for you will depend on a variety of factors, but we love the simplicity and ease the spiral saw blades provide. Made from carbon steel, these blades last long, are hardened and tempered to stay sharp and cut from all directions.

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Robert Johnson is a passionate furniture maker & carpenter, sought after for his knowledge on the craft.
You’ve probably seen his down-to-earth wisdom in USA Today, Bobvila, Family Handyman, and The Spruce, where he has shared commentary and guidance on various woodworking topics.

Robert is the brain behind Sawinery, where he aims to share tips, tricks, and a passion for all things carpentry.

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